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Russia blasts Western position on referendums as hypocritical in UN Human Rights Council

It was underscored that it was Western states who left the liberated territories "with no other choice" by their indifference to their fate

GENEVA, September 27. /TASS/. Russia views remarks made by Western representatives regarding the alleged illegitimacy of the accession referendums as hypocritical, Russian diplomat Stanislav Kovpak said, speaking at the UN Human Rights Council session in Geneva Tuesday.

He underscored that it was Western states who left the liberated territories "with no other choice" by their indifference to their fate.

"Delegations of Western states hypocritically talk about the illegitimacy of the referendums on the liberated territories in this hall. Meanwhile, it was them who, by indifference to their fate, left them with no other choice," the diplomat said. People do not want to live in constant fear of crazed Ukrainian nationalists anymore, the can no longer jeopardize the lives of their children."

Kovpak called the statements made by delegations of the EU, US and a number of other states during the Human Rights Council session regarding Russian actions in Ukraine "insinuations." He noted that there was no condemnation of Kiev for its strikes against civilian population of Donbass and the Kherson Region, adding that these states "stayed silent and have been covering for Kiev Nazis since 2014" and "continue to do so now."

The diplomat underscored that "the EU, the US and their followers" consider it possible to "hypocritically lecture other states and simultaneously crush all basics of freedom of opinion, restricting and outlawing operation of over one hundred mass media."

"The methods of fighting the freedom of expression in Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Poland and the Czech Republic look the most punitive," Kovpak noted, adding that "the picture is being completed by the Russophobia, which borders neo-Nazism, hate statement and actions, repressions against national and language minorities." These phenome "have returned and are now widespread in the modern Europe," he said.