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All inspected ISS modules air tight, crew’s isolation to end on Tuesday

A source told TASS on August 20 that the Russian-US crew on the ISS was tracking down a discovered air leak

MOSCOW, August 24. /TASS/. The crew of the International Space Station (ISS) will end its isolation in the orbital outpost’s Russian modules on Tuesday, following the results of a check that all the inspected premises are air tight, Russia’s State Space Corporation Roscosmos told TASS on Monday.

"Following the results of a working meeting of the Flight Control Centers from the partner counties, a decision was made to open the hatches at 11:00 a.m. Moscow time on August 25, 2020," Roscosmos said.

The participants in the working meeting stated that all the station’s inspected modules were air tight, the Russian space agency stressed.

After the hatches are opened, the crew will carry on its routine work on the ISS and continue monitoring the pressure and atmospheric levels aboard the station, Roscosmos said.

A source told TASS on August 20 that the Russian-US crew on the ISS was tracking down a discovered air leak. As the source said, "the air leak was registered by the sensors of the station’s Russian segment for measuring the content of nitrogen, oxygen and carbon dioxide in the station’s atmosphere."

The crewmembers were planning to sequentially seal off the station’s modules to track down the area where the pressure was failing.

Roscosmos told TASS that all the ISS crewmembers would move to the Zvezda service module for three days to organize air pressure control in the American segment’s modules. As Roscosmos specified, "during the three-day stay in the Russian segment, the crew will perform routine work."

The ISS crew comprises NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy and Russian cosmonauts Anatoly Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner.