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Short, intermediate-range missiles not discussed between US, Russian officials — Kremlin

Earlier, Sergey Ryabkov announced that Moscow did not see NATO’s desire to refrain from deploying short-and intermediate-range missiles in Europe and insisted on introducing a moratorium on the deployment of these weapons

MOSCOW, October 14. /TASS/. During their talks on Wednesday, Russian Presidential Aide Yuri Ushakov and US Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs Victoria Nuland did not discuss the issue of short-and intermediate-range missiles, Kremlin Spokesman Dmitry Peskov said.

"No, this was not discussed," the Kremlin spokesman said, answering a question if the topic of short-and intermediate-range missiles was raised at the meeting.

Earlier, Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergey Ryabkov announced that Moscow did not see NATO’s desire to refrain from deploying short-and intermediate-range missiles in Europe and insisted on introducing a moratorium on the deployment of these weapons.

On August 2, 2019, the United States formally withdrew from the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty, signed by the Soviet Union and the United States on December 8, 1987. It applied to deployed and non-deployed ground-based missiles of intermediate range (1,000-5,000 kilometers) and shorter range (500-1,000 kilometers). The US explained its actions in terms of Russia’s alleged refusal to comply with the American ultimatum-like demand that the new 9M729 cruise missiles be eliminated as violating the INF Treaty. Moscow vehemently dismissed all accusations, saying that the technical parameters of the 9M729 missiles are within the parameters allowed by the treaty and laid counterclaims to Washington.

In September 2019, Russian President Vladimir Putin sent a proposal to the leaders of several countries, including NATO member states, to introduce a moratorium on deploying intermediate-and shorter-range missiles in Europe and in other regions. The United States however literally turned down the initiative.