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Aircraft accident experts in UK lab to analyze Boeing black boxes

July 23, 2014, 14:42 UTC+3 LONDON
One of the boxes contains the information of the aircraft’s technical characteristics, while the other has the crew conversations and other sounds and noises aboard recorded
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© EPA/ROBERT GHEMENT

LONDON, July 23. /ITAR-TASS/. Flight recorders from the Boeing-777 that crashed in the Donetsk Region on July 17 have been delivered to a Farnborough lab in Britain authorized by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO).

According to the British air accidents investigation committee, the experts have everything they need available to analyze the black boxes that arrived on the Belgian Embraer aircraft. The equipment is placed in the airtight room with several loudspeakers on the walls to create a “sound picture” close to reality. There is only one more laboratory in France that is similarly equipped, specialists say.

British experts are confident they would analyze the flight recorders within 24 hours depending on their condition, said British Department for Transport spokesperson.

One of the boxes contains the information of the aircraft’s technical characteristics, while the other has the crew conversations and other sounds and noises aboard recorded.

However, even if the boxes’ condition was fine, they still can show “nothing of interest at all”, an aviation and safety researcher at Loughborough University David Gleave told BBC.

“If the missile exploded in close proximity to the plane and the tail was severed fully off it wouldn't have recorded anything from the cockpit at all,” he said.

Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 crashed on its way from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur in eastern Ukraine’s Donetsk Region on July 17. All 298 aboard died.

Experts say the tragedy in Ukraine is a reminder there is a need to reform the present flight security system.

Coordinated efforts of all ICAO members were needed to prevent a repeat of the tragedy near Donetsk, General Secretary of the British Airline Pilots’ Association (BALPA) Jim McAuslan told the UK Sky News channel.

“The process behind the choice of airspace routing is based on a risk assessment; both by a country's national aviation security services in the advice that they give to their airlines, and by the airline in how they assess this advice,” he said. This, however, was “vulnerable to all sorts of influences including commercial pressure”, he added. ICAO, McAuslan said, should immediately react to the tragedy and revise the approach to risk assessment of flight security in crisis spots around the world.

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