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CAS dismisses sprinter Timanovskaya’s request to overturn NOC of Belarus decision

The Belarusian Olympic Committee announced on Sunday that the national athletics coaching staff decided to send Timanovskaya home over her emotional and mental state

TOKYO, August 2./TASS/. The Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) has dismissed a request from Belarusian sprinter Kristina Timanovskaya to overturn the decision taken by the National Olympic Committee (NOC) of Belarus to strip her of 2020 Olympic accreditation.

The Belarusian sprinter "filed an urgent application and request for provisional measures in the morning of  August 2, 2021 seeking to overturn the decision taken by the NOC of Belarus not to let her participate in the Women’s 200m qualifying event at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games," a media release said.

Timanovskaya appealed to the court early on Monday. "The urgent request to stay the execution of the challenged decision was dismissed by the President of the CAS Ad hoc Division, as the athlete was not able to prove her case to get an interim relief," the media release said.

It was initially planned that she would take part in the 100m and 200m races. Timanovskaya skipped the women’s 200m heats earlier on Monday. On July 30, she failed to qualify for the finals in women's 100m sprint running.

The Belarusian Olympic Committee announced on Sunday that the national athletics coaching staff decided to send Timanovskaya home over her emotional and mental state. It was initially planned that she would take part in the 100m and 200m races. The coaching staff decided to nominate Timanovskaya to run in the 4x400m relay after two Belarusian runners were disqualified from participating in the event for not supplying enough doping samples. Timanovskaya took to social media to criticize this decision.

Belarus’ opposition Sports Solidarity Fund said that Timanovskaya was allegedly forced to leave Tokyo because of her criticism of the national track and field athletics coaches.

She told Euroradio that she wanted to seek asylum in Europe, and she asked for help from the International Olympic Committee via social networks. She claimed she was subject to pressure to leave Japan without her consent. Several European countries have offered her an asylum. The athlete is currently at the Polish Embassy in Tokyo.