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Russian Olympic chief praises handover of Pierre de Coubertin’s original manuscript to IOC

On Monday, Russian billionaire philanthropist and President of the Intэl Fencing Federation Alisher Usmanov donated to the Olympic Museum in Lausanne the original manuscript on the revival of the Olympic Games by Pierre de Coubertin

MOSCOW, February 13. /TASS/. A donation of the original manuscript of Pierre de Coubertin to the International Olympic Committee (IOC) was an important contribution of Russia to the Olympic movement, President of the Russian Olympic Committee (ROC) Stanislav Pozdnyakov said on Thursday.

Russian billionaire philanthropist and President of the International Fencing Federation (FIE) Alisher Usmanov donated to the Olympic Museum in Lausanne on Monday the original manuscript on the revival of the Olympic Games by Pierre de Coubertin, who is also known as ‘the father of the modern Olympics.’

"The handover of such document is a very important contribution of Russia into the international Olympic movement," Pozdnyakov told journalists. "The prestige of our country is high and it is not a subject to doubts."

"It makes us happy when such artifacts are handed over from private collections to the Olympic Museum," Pozdnyakov added.

The 14-page manuscript, which was written almost 130 years ago and contains Pierre de Coubertin’s original vision of the Olympic Games’ revival, garnered $8.8 million in an auction last December, but the name of the buyer was not disclosed.

Coubertin wrote the manifest in 1889 laying out the principles of reviving the ancient Olympics in the modern world and used it for his famous speech in Paris in 1892. Two years later, he founded the International Olympic Committee and the first modern Olympic Games were organized in 1896 in Athens.

Coubertin, who was a French educator and historian (1863-1937), is also the author of the Olympic Oath, the Olympics Emblem and he proposed the IOC motto of "Faster, Higher, Stronger" (Citius, Altius, Fortius; in Latin).

The IOC named a special award after Coubertin, which is known as the Coubertin medal or the True Spirit of Sportsmanship. It is awarded by the world’s governing Olympic body to athletes, who have demonstrated the true spirit of sportsmanship during the Olympic Games.

The first president of the IOC, when Coubertin founded in 1894, was Demetrios Vikelas. Coubertin served as the president of the International Olympic Committee twice in 1896-1916 and 1919-1925.