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Russian scientists say they can offer brain tumor remedy

The tests also found that that that substances that cause the reverse differentiation of neuroblastoma cells also affect intracellular parasites

MOSCOW, May 30. /TASS/. A group of scientists at the North Caucasus Federal University (NCFU) working on biologically active anticancer drugs have found an investor ready to support their research, the head of the NCFU Department of Chemistry, Professor Alexander Aksyonov told the media.

"We managed to identify substances against glioblastoma [a type of malignant brain tumor — TASS] that cause the reverse differentiation of affected cells. Cancer cells do not die but turn into healthy ones. Together with our American colleagues we obtained a patent for our products. Also, we have found an investor," he said without specifying exactly who was ready to provide support for further research.

This year, Aksyonov noted, NCFU scientists managed to find two sufficiently effective substances capable of causing the reverse differentiation effect with respect to the neuroblastoma.

The NCFU actively cooperates with researchers at the University of Texas, who are implementing a similar program for the search into anticancer drugs.

"We are very proud Texas professor Alexander Korniyenko won an American research grant to purchase about 20,000 compounds from the Oxford [medical] database. He conducted a series of tests to identify two active substances. We, in turn, sent only 32 substances to Texas for testing. Two of our samples turned out 2.5 times more effective than those from the Oxford database. Together with the University of Texas we have filed a patent for our discovery in the field of struggle against neuroblastoma," Aksyonov said.

The tests also found that that that substances that cause the reverse differentiation of neuroblastoma cells also affect intracellular parasites. According to the head of the NCFU Department of Chemistry the synthesized samples are effective against - leishmaniasis, a grave disease which annually affects about a million people in tropical countries.