Currency converter
^
News Search Topics
ОК
Use filter
You can filter your feed,
by choosing only interesting
sections.
Loading

The US First Ladies and their stylish contribution to the White House history

March 07, 19:59 UTC+3
Over the two centuries since the White House's construction, a lot has changed thanks to the First Ladies
Share
1 pages in this article
Реклама
Пропустить рекламу
{{$root.cfg.modules.slider.galleryTable_934369.stepNow *12 +1}} - 12 из {{$root.cfg.modules.slider.gallery_934369.sliderLength-1}}
{{$root.cfg.modules.slider.galleryTable_934369.stepNow *12 +1}} - 20 из {{$root.cfg.modules.slider.gallery_934369.sliderLength-1}}
The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States. Construction of the mansion took place between 1792 and 1800. Thomas Jefferson moved into the house in 1801
The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States. Construction of the mansion took place between 1792 and 1800. Thomas Jefferson moved into the house in 1801
The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States. Construction of the mansion took place between 1792 and 1800. Thomas Jefferson moved into the house in 1801
© EPA/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/POOL
In 1814 the White House was set ablaze by British troops during the Burning of Washington. Only the exterior walls remained, and they had to be torn down and mostly reconstructed. Photo: Presidential bedroom, 1891
In 1814 the White House was set ablaze by British troops during the Burning of Washington. Only the exterior walls remained, and they had to be torn down and mostly reconstructed. Photo: Presidential bedroom, 1891
In 1814 the White House was set ablaze by British troops during the Burning of Washington. Only the exterior walls remained, and they had to be torn down and mostly reconstructed. Photo: Presidential bedroom, 1891
© Frances Benjamin Johnston/Library of Congress
In 1891, First Lady Caroline Harrison proposed major changes to the White House. She laid new floors, installed new plumbing, painted and wallpapered, and added more bathrooms. In 1891 she had electricity installed but was too frightened to handle the switches. She left the lights on all night and a building engineer turned them off each morning. Photo: Kitchen in the White House, 1891
In 1891, First Lady Caroline Harrison proposed major changes to the White House. She laid new floors, installed new plumbing, painted and wallpapered, and added more bathrooms. In 1891 she had electricity installed but was too frightened to handle the switches. She left the lights on all night and a building engineer turned them off each morning. Photo: Kitchen in the White House, 1891
In 1891, First Lady Caroline Harrison proposed major changes to the White House. She laid new floors, installed new plumbing, painted and wallpapered, and added more bathrooms. In 1891 she had electricity installed but was too frightened to handle the switches. She left the lights on all night and a building engineer turned them off each morning. Photo: Kitchen in the White House, 1891
© Frances Benjamin Johnston/Library of Congress
The West Wing was the idea of President Theodore Roosevelt' wife  Edith, who stated that the second floor of the White House, then shared between bedrooms and offices, should be just a domestic space. Photo: The West Wing of the White House
The West Wing was the idea of President Theodore Roosevelt' wife  Edith, who stated that the second floor of the White House, then shared between bedrooms and offices, should be just a domestic space. Photo: The West Wing of the White House
The West Wing was the idea of President Theodore Roosevelt' wife Edith, who stated that the second floor of the White House, then shared between bedrooms and offices, should be just a domestic space. Photo: The West Wing of the White House
© Library of Congress
Roosevelt moved the offices of the executive branch to the newly constructed wing in 1902. Photo: Ther shed near the West Wing of the White House
Roosevelt moved the offices of the executive branch to the newly constructed wing in 1902. Photo: Ther shed near the West Wing of the White House
Roosevelt moved the offices of the executive branch to the newly constructed wing in 1902. Photo: Ther shed near the West Wing of the White House
© Jack E. Boucher/Library of Congress
The wife of Woodrow Wilson, Edith kept sheep at the White House. The flock saved manpower by cutting the grass and earned money for the Red Cross through an auction of their wool. Photo: The sheep graze on the lawn of the White House
The wife of Woodrow Wilson, Edith kept sheep at the White House. The flock saved manpower by cutting the grass and earned money for the Red Cross through an auction of their wool. Photo: The sheep graze on the lawn of the White House
The wife of Woodrow Wilson, Edith kept sheep at the White House. The flock saved manpower by cutting the grass and earned money for the Red Cross through an auction of their wool. Photo: The sheep graze on the lawn of the White House
© Harris & Ewing/Library of Congress
The Solarium, a square room atop the South Portico, was built as part of the addition in 1927 of a Third Floor to the Executive Mansion, during the administration of Calvin Coolidge. Originally, the Solarium was the brainchild of First Lady Grace Coolidge
The Solarium, a square room atop the South Portico, was built as part of the addition in 1927 of a Third Floor to the Executive Mansion, during the administration of Calvin Coolidge. Originally, the Solarium was the brainchild of First Lady Grace Coolidge
The Solarium, a square room atop the South Portico, was built as part of the addition in 1927 of a Third Floor to the Executive Mansion, during the administration of Calvin Coolidge. Originally, the Solarium was the brainchild of First Lady Grace Coolidge
© Jack E. Boucher/Library of Congress
The Presidents Swimming Pool in the White House, 1938
The Presidents Swimming Pool in the White House, 1938
The Presidents Swimming Pool in the White House, 1938
© AP Photo
US first lady Jacqueline Kennedy directed a very extensive and historic redecoration of the house. Photo: Jacqueline Kennedy checks the table setting of White House gold service in the state dining room, 1962
US first lady Jacqueline Kennedy directed a very extensive and historic redecoration of the house. Photo: Jacqueline Kennedy checks the table setting of White House gold service in the state dining room, 1962
US first lady Jacqueline Kennedy directed a very extensive and historic redecoration of the house. Photo: Jacqueline Kennedy checks the table setting of White House gold service in the state dining room, 1962
© AP Photo
The Kennedy restoration resulted in a more authentic White House of grander stature. Photo: Jacqueline Kennedy poses with officers of the American Institute of Interior Designers at the formal opening of the restored and refurnished White House ground floor library, 1962
The Kennedy restoration resulted in a more authentic White House of grander stature. Photo: Jacqueline Kennedy poses with officers of the American Institute of Interior Designers at the formal opening of the restored and refurnished White House ground floor library, 1962
The Kennedy restoration resulted in a more authentic White House of grander stature. Photo: Jacqueline Kennedy poses with officers of the American Institute of Interior Designers at the formal opening of the restored and refurnished White House ground floor library, 1962
© AP Photo/Byron Rollins
While in office, US President Jimmy Carter installed 32 solar panels on the White House roof. Photo: Jimmy Carter showing reporters and other guests new solar panels on the West Wing providing hot water for the White House, 1979
While in office, US President Jimmy Carter installed 32 solar panels on the White House roof. Photo: Jimmy Carter showing reporters and other guests new solar panels on the West Wing providing hot water for the White House, 1979
While in office, US President Jimmy Carter installed 32 solar panels on the White House roof. Photo: Jimmy Carter showing reporters and other guests new solar panels on the West Wing providing hot water for the White House, 1979
© EPA/JIMMY CARTER LIBRARY
In the 1990s, Bill and Hillary Clinton refurbished some rooms, including the Oval Office, the East Room, Blue Room, State Dining Room, Lincoln Bedroom, and Lincoln Sitting Room. Photo: Hillary Clinton unveils the renovated Blue Room of the White House, 1995
In the 1990s, Bill and Hillary Clinton refurbished some rooms, including the Oval Office, the East Room, Blue Room, State Dining Room, Lincoln Bedroom, and Lincoln Sitting Room. Photo: Hillary Clinton unveils the renovated Blue Room of the White House, 1995
In the 1990s, Bill and Hillary Clinton refurbished some rooms, including the Oval Office, the East Room, Blue Room, State Dining Room, Lincoln Bedroom, and Lincoln Sitting Room. Photo: Hillary Clinton unveils the renovated Blue Room of the White House, 1995
© AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite
During the administration of George W. Bush, Laura Bush refurbished the Lincoln Bedroom in a style contemporary with the Lincoln era. Photo: View of the Lincoln Bedroom in the White House
During the administration of George W. Bush, Laura Bush refurbished the Lincoln Bedroom in a style contemporary with the Lincoln era. Photo: View of the Lincoln Bedroom in the White House
During the administration of George W. Bush, Laura Bush refurbished the Lincoln Bedroom in a style contemporary with the Lincoln era. Photo: View of the Lincoln Bedroom in the White House
© REUTERS
In 1961 the White House was declared a museum. Photo: The East Wing Hallway of the White House, 2016
In 1961 the White House was declared a museum. Photo: The East Wing Hallway of the White House, 2016
In 1961 the White House was declared a museum. Photo: The East Wing Hallway of the White House, 2016
© AP Photo/Andrew Harnik
Furniture, fixtures, and decorative arts could now be declared either historic or of artistic interest by the President. This prevented them from being sold. Photo: First Lady Laura Bush takes Michelle Obama for a private tour of the artwork in the East Wing (Green room) of the White House, 2009
Furniture, fixtures, and decorative arts could now be declared either historic or of artistic interest by the President. This prevented them from being sold. Photo: First Lady Laura Bush takes Michelle Obama for a private tour of the artwork in the East Wing (Green room) of the White House, 2009
Furniture, fixtures, and decorative arts could now be declared either historic or of artistic interest by the President. This prevented them from being sold. Photo: First Lady Laura Bush takes Michelle Obama for a private tour of the artwork in the East Wing (Green room) of the White House, 2009
© Charles Ommanney/Getty Images
When not in use or display at the White House, these items were to be turned over to the Smithsonian Institution for preservation, study, storage, or exhibition. Photo: Barack Obama during a meeting with advisors
When not in use or display at the White House, these items were to be turned over to the Smithsonian Institution for preservation, study, storage, or exhibition. Photo: Barack Obama during a meeting with advisors
When not in use or display at the White House, these items were to be turned over to the Smithsonian Institution for preservation, study, storage, or exhibition. Photo: Barack Obama during a meeting with advisors
© Official White House Photo by Pete Souza
Flowers bloom in the Rose Garden outside the West Wing of the White House, 2015
Flowers bloom in the Rose Garden outside the West Wing of the White House, 2015
Flowers bloom in the Rose Garden outside the West Wing of the White House, 2015
© Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images
Former US first lady Michelle Obama planted the White House's first organic garden and installed beehives on the South Lawn of the White House. Photo: Michelle Obama carries just-harvested pumpkins while joining with school children to harvest fruits and vegetable from the White House Kitchen Garden, 2013
Former US first lady Michelle Obama planted the White House's first organic garden and installed beehives on the South Lawn of the White House. Photo: Michelle Obama carries just-harvested pumpkins while joining with school children to harvest fruits and vegetable from the White House Kitchen Garden, 2013
Former US first lady Michelle Obama planted the White House's first organic garden and installed beehives on the South Lawn of the White House. Photo: Michelle Obama carries just-harvested pumpkins while joining with school children to harvest fruits and vegetable from the White House Kitchen Garden, 2013
© Win McNamee/Getty Images
Recently, US President Donald Trump announced the reopenning of the White House public tours. Photo: Photos of President Donald Trump's inauguration are hung on the walls of corridors in the West Wing of the White House in Washington, 2017
Recently, US President Donald Trump announced the reopenning of the White House public tours. Photo: Photos of President Donald Trump's inauguration are hung on the walls of corridors in the West Wing of the White House in Washington, 2017
Recently, US President Donald Trump announced the reopenning of the White House public tours. Photo: Photos of President Donald Trump's inauguration are hung on the walls of corridors in the West Wing of the White House in Washington, 2017
© AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais
The changes of the White House interiors under Trumps are yet to come. Photo: US President Donald J. Trump, Vice President Mike Pence, First Lady Melania Trump and his daughter Ivanka in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, 2017
The changes of the White House interiors under Trumps are yet to come. Photo: US President Donald J. Trump, Vice President Mike Pence, First Lady Melania Trump and his daughter Ivanka in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, 2017
The changes of the White House interiors under Trumps are yet to come. Photo: US President Donald J. Trump, Vice President Mike Pence, First Lady Melania Trump and his daughter Ivanka in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, 2017
© EPA/ERIK S. LESSER
1
...
{{item.num+1}}
...
{{$root.cfg.modules.slider['gallery_934369'].sliderLength - 1}}
{{$root.cfg.modules.slider['gallery_934369'].sliderLength - 1}}
+
The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States. Construction of the mansion took place between 1792 and 1800. Thomas Jefferson moved into the house in 1801
© EPA/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/POOL
In 1814 the White House was set ablaze by British troops during the Burning of Washington. Only the exterior walls remained, and they had to be torn down and mostly reconstructed. Photo: Presidential bedroom, 1891
© Frances Benjamin Johnston/Library of Congress
In 1891, First Lady Caroline Harrison proposed major changes to the White House. She laid new floors, installed new plumbing, painted and wallpapered, and added more bathrooms. In 1891 she had electricity installed but was too frightened to handle the switches. She left the lights on all night and a building engineer turned them off each morning. Photo: Kitchen in the White House, 1891
© Frances Benjamin Johnston/Library of Congress
The West Wing was the idea of President Theodore Roosevelt' wife Edith, who stated that the second floor of the White House, then shared between bedrooms and offices, should be just a domestic space. Photo: The West Wing of the White House
© Library of Congress
Roosevelt moved the offices of the executive branch to the newly constructed wing in 1902. Photo: Ther shed near the West Wing of the White House
© Jack E. Boucher/Library of Congress
The wife of Woodrow Wilson, Edith kept sheep at the White House. The flock saved manpower by cutting the grass and earned money for the Red Cross through an auction of their wool. Photo: The sheep graze on the lawn of the White House
© Harris & Ewing/Library of Congress
The Solarium, a square room atop the South Portico, was built as part of the addition in 1927 of a Third Floor to the Executive Mansion, during the administration of Calvin Coolidge. Originally, the Solarium was the brainchild of First Lady Grace Coolidge
© Jack E. Boucher/Library of Congress
The Presidents Swimming Pool in the White House, 1938
© AP Photo
US first lady Jacqueline Kennedy directed a very extensive and historic redecoration of the house. Photo: Jacqueline Kennedy checks the table setting of White House gold service in the state dining room, 1962
© AP Photo
The Kennedy restoration resulted in a more authentic White House of grander stature. Photo: Jacqueline Kennedy poses with officers of the American Institute of Interior Designers at the formal opening of the restored and refurnished White House ground floor library, 1962
© AP Photo/Byron Rollins
While in office, US President Jimmy Carter installed 32 solar panels on the White House roof. Photo: Jimmy Carter showing reporters and other guests new solar panels on the West Wing providing hot water for the White House, 1979
© EPA/JIMMY CARTER LIBRARY
In the 1990s, Bill and Hillary Clinton refurbished some rooms, including the Oval Office, the East Room, Blue Room, State Dining Room, Lincoln Bedroom, and Lincoln Sitting Room. Photo: Hillary Clinton unveils the renovated Blue Room of the White House, 1995
© AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite
During the administration of George W. Bush, Laura Bush refurbished the Lincoln Bedroom in a style contemporary with the Lincoln era. Photo: View of the Lincoln Bedroom in the White House
© REUTERS
In 1961 the White House was declared a museum. Photo: The East Wing Hallway of the White House, 2016
© AP Photo/Andrew Harnik
Furniture, fixtures, and decorative arts could now be declared either historic or of artistic interest by the President. This prevented them from being sold. Photo: First Lady Laura Bush takes Michelle Obama for a private tour of the artwork in the East Wing (Green room) of the White House, 2009
© Charles Ommanney/Getty Images
When not in use or display at the White House, these items were to be turned over to the Smithsonian Institution for preservation, study, storage, or exhibition. Photo: Barack Obama during a meeting with advisors
© Official White House Photo by Pete Souza
Flowers bloom in the Rose Garden outside the West Wing of the White House, 2015
© Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images
Former US first lady Michelle Obama planted the White House's first organic garden and installed beehives on the South Lawn of the White House. Photo: Michelle Obama carries just-harvested pumpkins while joining with school children to harvest fruits and vegetable from the White House Kitchen Garden, 2013
© Win McNamee/Getty Images
Recently, US President Donald Trump announced the reopenning of the White House public tours. Photo: Photos of President Donald Trump's inauguration are hung on the walls of corridors in the West Wing of the White House in Washington, 2017
© AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais
The changes of the White House interiors under Trumps are yet to come. Photo: US President Donald J. Trump, Vice President Mike Pence, First Lady Melania Trump and his daughter Ivanka in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, 2017
© EPA/ERIK S. LESSER

Recently, US President Donald Trump announced the reopenning of the White House public tours. Here are some of the ways how the White House has changed throughout the years — from well-known restoration project by Jackie Kennedy to Edith Wilson's sheep at the White House. 

Show more
Share
In other media
Реклама
Реклама