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Syrian politician: Antiterror efforts near Aleppo won't hinder political settlement

April 15, 5:23 UTC+3
The ceasefire regime does not cover the Islamic State and Jabhat al-Nusra terrorist organizations as well as other groups recognized as terrorist by the Security Council
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©  Mikhail Metzel archive / TASS

GENEVA, April 15. /TASS/. The fight against terrorists near the city of Aleppo will not hinder the political process in Syria, Qadri Jamil, a leader of Syria’s Popular Front for Change and Liberation and a representative of the Syrian oppositional "Moscow platform" (posing at the talks within the framework of the Moscow-Cairo Group), said.

Jamil commented, on a TASS request, on the words of Russian President Vladimir Putin on the situation in that Syrian region.

During his annual televised Q&A session officially known as "The Direct Line with Vladimir Putin" on Thursday, the Russian leader noted the complicated situation around Aleppo. 

Putin said the groups fighting in Aleppo "make attempts to improve their situation", whereas the Syrian army "does not need to improve its positions."

"I think the concern of President Putin is justified. I think the speeding up of a political solution will lead to the resolution of difficulties not only near Aleppo, this is a main line that will make it possible to solve problems across Syria," Jamil said.

"But it should be remembered that the United Nations Security Council resolution envisions, along with the political process, the fight against terrorists, while Jabhat al-Nusra are terrorists," he said. "So I think the fight against terrorists and the political process may proceed simultaneously."

The ceasefire regime took effect in Syria on February 27. Shortly before, the UN Security Council adopted a resolution supporting a cessation of hostilities. The document drafted by Russia and the United States was backed by all 15 Security Council member states.

The ceasefire regime does not cover the Islamic State and Jabhat al-Nusra terrorist organizations as well as other groups recognized as terrorist by the Security Council.

Russia’s Aerospace Forces started delivering pinpoint strikes in Syria at facilities of Islamic State and Jabhat al-Nusra, which are banned in Russia, on September 30, 2015, on a request from Syrian President Bashar Assad.

On March 14, 2016, Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered to start, from March 15, withdrawing the main part of the Russian Aerospace Forces’ group from Syria. Putin said the tasks set before the military "have been fulfilled on the whole." Russian Deputy Defense Minister Nikolai Pankov said strikes on terrorists will continue to be delivered.

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