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Japan restarts first nuclear reactor since Fukushima disaster

August 11, 2015, 19:00 UTC+3
On Augist 11 Japan restarted its first nuclear reactor under new safety rules following the 2011 Fukushima disaster
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On Augist 11 Japan restarted its first nuclear reactor under new safety rules following the 2011 Fukushima disaster. Photo: Protesters shouting slogans during an anti-nuclear rally in Tokyo, Aug. 11, 2015.
On Augist 11 Japan restarted its first nuclear reactor under new safety rules following the 2011 Fukushima disaster. Photo: Protesters shouting slogans during an anti-nuclear rally in Tokyo, Aug. 11, 2015.
On Augist 11 Japan restarted its first nuclear reactor under new safety rules following the 2011 Fukushima disaster. Photo: Protesters shouting slogans during an anti-nuclear rally in Tokyo, Aug. 11, 2015.
© AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi
Kyushu Electric Power Co. said Tuesday, it had restarted the No. 1 reactor at its Sendai nuclear plant. Photo: A condensate storage tank which was prepared for tornado at Sendai Nuclear Power Station, Kagoshima prefecture, southern Japan
Kyushu Electric Power Co. said Tuesday, it had restarted the No. 1 reactor at its Sendai nuclear plant. Photo: A condensate storage tank which was prepared for tornado at Sendai Nuclear Power Station, Kagoshima prefecture, southern Japan
Kyushu Electric Power Co. said Tuesday, it had restarted the No. 1 reactor at its Sendai nuclear plant. Photo: A condensate storage tank which was prepared for tornado at Sendai Nuclear Power Station, Kagoshima prefecture, southern Japan
© AP Photo/Kyodo News
The restart marks Japan's return to nuclear energy four-and-half-years after the 2011 meltdowns at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in northeastern Japan following an earthquake and tsunami. Photo: Anti-nuclear rally in front of Prime Minister's official residence in Tokyo, Aug. 11, 2015
The restart marks Japan's return to nuclear energy four-and-half-years after the 2011 meltdowns at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in northeastern Japan following an earthquake and tsunami. Photo: Anti-nuclear rally in front of Prime Minister's official residence in Tokyo, Aug. 11, 2015
The restart marks Japan's return to nuclear energy four-and-half-years after the 2011 meltdowns at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in northeastern Japan following an earthquake and tsunami. Photo: Anti-nuclear rally in front of Prime Minister's official residence in Tokyo, Aug. 11, 2015
© AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi
After the Fukushima nuclear disaster, all the nation's 48 commercial nuclear reactors were shut down. Photo: protester seen during an anti-nuclear rally in Tokyo, Aug. 11
After the Fukushima nuclear disaster, all the nation's 48 commercial nuclear reactors were shut down. Photo: protester seen during an anti-nuclear rally in Tokyo, Aug. 11
After the Fukushima nuclear disaster, all the nation's 48 commercial nuclear reactors were shut down. Photo: protester seen during an anti-nuclear rally in Tokyo, Aug. 11
© AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi
The government later introduced stricter safety standards in case of accidents and disasters. Photo: Reactor buildings at Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma
The government later introduced stricter safety standards in case of accidents and disasters. Photo: Reactor buildings at Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma
The government later introduced stricter safety standards in case of accidents and disasters. Photo: Reactor buildings at Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma
© AP Photo/Kimimasa Mayama, Pool
In March 2011 the tsunami triggered by the quake in Japan left more than 18,000 people dead or missing. A gigantic wave hit the nuclear power plant Fukushima-1 that resulted in the most devastating nuclear disaster since the Chernobyl nuclear power plant catastrophe in 1986. Photo: Crippled reactor building of Tokyo Electric Power Co., Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, northeastern Japan
In March 2011 the tsunami triggered by the quake in Japan left more than 18,000 people dead or missing. A gigantic wave hit the nuclear power plant Fukushima-1 that resulted in the most devastating nuclear disaster since the Chernobyl nuclear power plant catastrophe in 1986. Photo: Crippled reactor building of Tokyo Electric Power Co., Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, northeastern Japan
In March 2011 the tsunami triggered by the quake in Japan left more than 18,000 people dead or missing. A gigantic wave hit the nuclear power plant Fukushima-1 that resulted in the most devastating nuclear disaster since the Chernobyl nuclear power plant catastrophe in 1986. Photo: Crippled reactor building of Tokyo Electric Power Co., Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, northeastern Japan
© AP Photo/Yoshikazu Tsuno, Pool
The government later said nuclear power plants will be decommissioned when their authorized 40-year lifespans expire. Photo: workers is given a radiation screening at the emergency operation center at the crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station in Okuma, 2011
The government later said nuclear power plants will be decommissioned when their authorized 40-year lifespans expire. Photo: workers is given a radiation screening at the emergency operation center at the crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station in Okuma, 2011
The government later said nuclear power plants will be decommissioned when their authorized 40-year lifespans expire. Photo: workers is given a radiation screening at the emergency operation center at the crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station in Okuma, 2011
© AP Photo/David Guttenfelder, Pool
Japan’s energy companies submitted applications for another 19 reactors to resume their operations, but the process was slowed down by safety checks and paperwork. Photo: Central operating control room of the No. 1 and No. 2 reactors of Tokyo Electric Power Co. at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, 2014
Japan’s energy companies submitted applications for another 19 reactors to resume their operations, but the process was slowed down by safety checks and paperwork. Photo: Central operating control room of the No. 1 and No. 2 reactors of Tokyo Electric Power Co. at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, 2014
Japan’s energy companies submitted applications for another 19 reactors to resume their operations, but the process was slowed down by safety checks and paperwork. Photo: Central operating control room of the No. 1 and No. 2 reactors of Tokyo Electric Power Co. at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, 2014
© AP Photo/Koji Sasahara, Pool
The reopening of the 1.78GW nuclear power station will be an important benchmark in Japan’s energy policy. Photo: Workers building tanks to store radioactive water in the compound of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma t, 2014
The reopening of the 1.78GW nuclear power station will be an important benchmark in Japan’s energy policy. Photo: Workers building tanks to store radioactive water in the compound of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma t, 2014
The reopening of the 1.78GW nuclear power station will be an important benchmark in Japan’s energy policy. Photo: Workers building tanks to store radioactive water in the compound of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma t, 2014
© AP Photo/Koji Sasahara, Pool
Earthquake-damaged road in the abandoned town of Naraha, which was once inside the nuclear exclusion zone surrounding the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant, in Japan
Earthquake-damaged road in the abandoned town of Naraha, which was once inside the nuclear exclusion zone surrounding the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant, in Japan
Earthquake-damaged road in the abandoned town of Naraha, which was once inside the nuclear exclusion zone surrounding the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant, in Japan
© AP Photo/Greg Baker
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On Augist 11 Japan restarted its first nuclear reactor under new safety rules following the 2011 Fukushima disaster. Photo: Protesters shouting slogans during an anti-nuclear rally in Tokyo, Aug. 11, 2015.
© AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi
Kyushu Electric Power Co. said Tuesday, it had restarted the No. 1 reactor at its Sendai nuclear plant. Photo: A condensate storage tank which was prepared for tornado at Sendai Nuclear Power Station, Kagoshima prefecture, southern Japan
© AP Photo/Kyodo News
The restart marks Japan's return to nuclear energy four-and-half-years after the 2011 meltdowns at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in northeastern Japan following an earthquake and tsunami. Photo: Anti-nuclear rally in front of Prime Minister's official residence in Tokyo, Aug. 11, 2015
© AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi
After the Fukushima nuclear disaster, all the nation's 48 commercial nuclear reactors were shut down. Photo: protester seen during an anti-nuclear rally in Tokyo, Aug. 11
© AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi
The government later introduced stricter safety standards in case of accidents and disasters. Photo: Reactor buildings at Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma
© AP Photo/Kimimasa Mayama, Pool
In March 2011 the tsunami triggered by the quake in Japan left more than 18,000 people dead or missing. A gigantic wave hit the nuclear power plant Fukushima-1 that resulted in the most devastating nuclear disaster since the Chernobyl nuclear power plant catastrophe in 1986. Photo: Crippled reactor building of Tokyo Electric Power Co., Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, northeastern Japan
© AP Photo/Yoshikazu Tsuno, Pool
The government later said nuclear power plants will be decommissioned when their authorized 40-year lifespans expire. Photo: workers is given a radiation screening at the emergency operation center at the crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station in Okuma, 2011
© AP Photo/David Guttenfelder, Pool
Japan’s energy companies submitted applications for another 19 reactors to resume their operations, but the process was slowed down by safety checks and paperwork. Photo: Central operating control room of the No. 1 and No. 2 reactors of Tokyo Electric Power Co. at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, 2014
© AP Photo/Koji Sasahara, Pool
The reopening of the 1.78GW nuclear power station will be an important benchmark in Japan’s energy policy. Photo: Workers building tanks to store radioactive water in the compound of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma t, 2014
© AP Photo/Koji Sasahara, Pool
Earthquake-damaged road in the abandoned town of Naraha, which was once inside the nuclear exclusion zone surrounding the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant, in Japan
© AP Photo/Greg Baker

On Augist 11 Japan restarted its first nuclear reactor under new safety rules following the 2011 Fukushima disaster. The restart marks Japan's return to nuclear energy 4,5 years after the meltdowns at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in northeastern Japan following an earthquake and tsunami. Public reaction and aftermath of Fukushima crisis - in photo gallery by TASS.

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