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Russia will not let anyone isolate itself — Duma speaker

February 11, 2015, 12:54 UTC+3 MOSCOW
The so-called anti-Russian sanctions introduced by the West have nothing in common with international law and WTO (World Trade Organization) principles, State Duma Speaker Sergey Naryshkin says
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© ITAR-TASS/Vladimir Smirnov

MOSCOW, February 11. /TASS/. Russia does not plan to isolate itself and will not let anyone do that as well, State Duma Speaker Sergey Naryshkin said on Wednesday.

"Of course, the situation in the Russian economy, as well as in the world economy, is not easy. There are not only objective, but also subjective reasons for that," Naryshkin said. One of the reasons is that "governments of a number of Western countries that always defended the principles of the market economy, suddenly became its biggest violators," he added. "They introduced the so-called anti-Russian sanctions that have nothing in common with international law and WTO (World Trade Organization) principles," he noted.

"However, Russia does not want to be isolated from the world economy and, of course, does not plan to isolate itself and will not let anyone do that as well, no matter how hard anyone tries," the speaker concluded.

"Strengthening international cooperation — both political and economic — is now as important as fighting for observing international law," Naryshkin said.

"Both political and legal system of the modern democratic Russia, potential of the Russian economy, along with the rather high level of unity in the Russian society, allow to withstand any external challenges and, more than that, to turn them into stimuli for the country’s development," he stressed.

"Undoubtedly, oil prices always were and still remain the special factor in the development of the Russian economy. However, even in the most difficult situations, the result is determined not by new external circumstances, but by the reaction to these circumstances," Naryshkin said.

The speaker said it is important to think about what advantages could be provided by current oil prices and currency exchange rates; what tasks may be solved more efficiently than before; which spheres of economy can gain competitive advantages; what reforms should be carried out in the oil and gas sector; and, finally, how the efficiency of the government regulation can be increased in the current conditions.

"All of this, of course, [should be followed] with unconditional adherence to constitutional guarantees of freedom of economic activity, labor and private property," Naryshkin added.

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