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Woman returning from west Africa tested for Ebola at Edinburgh hospital

January 16, 2015, 4:39 UTC+3 LONDON
On Thursday, the British authorities said another female patient hospitalized with suspected Ebola in Northampton, had tested negative for the virus
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LONDON, January 16. /TASS/. A woman who recently returned from west Africa has been hospitalized with suspected Ebola after developing a fewer, representatives from Britain’s National Health Service reported late on Thursday.

The female patient was admitted to Edinburgh's Western General Hospital, the report said.

On Thursday, the British authorities said another female patient hospitalized with suspected Ebola in Northampton, had tested negative for the virus.

A Scottish nurse, Pauline Cafferkey, is undergoing treatment at London’s Royal Free Hospital. She became the first confirmed UK case of Ebola after returning from west Africa where she took part in volunteer work to fight the deadly epidemic.

Her condition has improved and is not qualified as critical any longer. She is treated with blood transfusions from survivors of the disease.

The number of people killed by the Ebola virus has reached 8,429, the World Health Organization (WHO) said in a report Wednesday.

A total of 21,296 cases of the Ebola virus disease (EVD) have been reported, the statement said.

In line with statistics, the maximum number of Ebola-related deaths and cases has been registered in Liberia - 3,538 cumulative deaths and 8,331 cumulative cases. Liberia is followed by Sierra Leone (3,062 deaths and 10,124 cases) and Guinea (1,814 and 2,806 respectively).

Separate cases have also been registered in Mali, Nigeria, Senegal, Spain, Britain and the United States.

The Ebola virus disease, previously known as the Ebola hemorrhagic fever, is a severe illness in humans, often fatal, according to the WHO. The virus is passed on to people from wild animals and can be transmitted from humans to humans. The average EVD case death rate is some 50%

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