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Central Election Commission sums up results of elections in Verkhovna Rada

November 11, 2014, 4:09 UTC+3 KIEV
Courts have ruled that votes be recounted in constituency No. 63 in the city of Berdichev, the central Zhiromir region, and No. 38 in Novomoskovsk, Dnepropetrovsk region
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KIEV, November 11. /TASS/. Ukraine’s Central Election Commission has summed up results of the October 26 early election to the Verkhovna Rada, the national parliament, but refined data on results in two constituencies is expected after court rulings, CEC chairman Mikhail Okhendovsky said on Tuesday.

“We did an urgent summiting up of all the results of voting, and refinements on constituencies 38 and 63 are expected after court rulings,” he said.

Courts have ruled that votes be recounted in constituency No. 63 in the city of Berdichev, the central Zhiromir region, and No. 38 in Novomoskovsk, Dnepropetrovsk region.

Pyotr Poroshenko Bloc comes at the top of the list with 132 seats in the Rada, including 63 seats received on party tickets and another 69, in single-mandate constituencies.

Standing next in line is the People’s Front led by Arseny Yatsenyuk with 82 seats, eighteen of which have been received in single-mandate constituencies.

Samopomich (Self-Assistance) party led by Andrei Sadovyi, the mayor of the western city of Lvov, has gotten 33 seats, with only one deputy elected in a single-mandate constituency.

Opposition Bloc led by Yuri Boiko has gotten 29 mandates, of which 27 have been obtained on party tickets.

A total of 22 mandates, all of them earned on party tickets, go over to the Radical Party led by Oleg Lyashko.

Batkivshchina (Fatherland) party of the former Prime Minister and convict Yulia Timoshenko will have 19 MPs, including 17 elected on party lists.

The neo-Nazi Svoboda party has received six mandates.

Also, a total of 96 self-nominated deputies have been elected.

In line with Ukrainian electoral law, 50% of the deputies are elected on party lists and another but this time the number of deputies elected in single-mandate constituencies is 198, not 225 as in the 2012 election.

The Ukrainian electoral system still reserves seats for hypothetical ten deputies, who might have represented Crimea, and two deputies for the city of Sevastopol, although the Republic of Crimea and Sevastopol chose to part with Ukraine and to reunite with Russia after a forced interval of sixty years in March 2014.

In addition, there was no voting in fifteen constituencies in the much-troubled war-torn Donetsk and Luhansk regions in the east of the country.

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