Currency converter
^
News Feed
News Search Topics
ОК
Use filter
You can filter your feed,
by choosing only interesting
sections.
Loading

Japan’s government resigns en bloc

September 03, 2014, 9:43 UTC+3
In the afternoon, the formation of a new cabinet is expected; the prime minister plans to replace eleven ministers at once
1 pages in this article
Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe

Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe

© EPA/MARIO RUIZ

TOKYO, September 3. /ITAR-TASS/. The Japanese government has resigned en bloc upon the demand of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. He personally collected the corresponding petitions at an extraordinary session of the government.

The resignation of the government en bloc is a standard formal procedure designed for making personnel reshuffle in the country’s cabinet.

The government that steps down will nominally perform its duties until Wednesday afternoon. Then, the formation of a new cabinet is expected. The prime minister plans to replace eleven ministers at once. In particular, among them are the chiefs of the defense, justice and economic authorities. It is expected that the new government will feature at least five women. This is a personal initiative of Shinzo Abe aimed at the promotion of women’s role in the political and economic life of Japan.

It is likely that the Defense Ministry will be chaired by Akinori Eto, who is one of the key managers of the current membership of the ministry reporting to the now-resigned Itsunori Onodera. It is also known that the new cabinet will feature the daughter of ex-prime minister Keizo Obuchi — Yuko Obuchi, however, it is still unclear, which ministry she will lead.

It is mostly probably that Vice Prime Minister and Finance Minister Taro Aso, Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida, Minister of Education, Sports and Science Hakubun Shimomura, Secretary General of the Cabinet Yoshihide Suga and Minister for Economic Recovery Akira Amari will preserve their posts.

The cabinet, which stepped down on Wednesday, became the most long-living in the whole Japan’s history after WWII. Since its formation in December 2012 and until today, the membership of the government was never altered, which is highly unusual for Japan.

Media: Minister of foreign affairs keeps his seat

Japan’s Minister of Foreign Affairs Fumio Kishida has preserved his post in the new composition of the country’s government, local media report.

Thus, as experts say, Japan’s foreign policy will not undergo any significant changes.

57-year-old Kishida has been the country’s foreign minister since December 26, 2012, and before that, he was holding the post of state minister for affairs of Okinawa and northern territories within the cabinet of Yasuo Fukuda.

Media also report that, together with Fumio Kishida, another five politicians will preserve their posts: Vice Prime Minister and Finance Minister Taro Aso, Minister of Education, Sports and Science Hakubun Shimomura, Secretary General of the Cabinet Yoshihide Suga, Minister for Economic Recovery Akira Amari and Minister for State Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism Akihiro Ota.

Show more
In other media
Реклама
Реклама