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Four decades of West Germany

May 23, 2014, 12:32 UTC+3
The Federal Republic of Germany was created 65 years ago
1 pages in this article
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On 4–11 February 1945 US, UK and Soviet leaders held a conference in the USSR's Yalta, where they made arrengements about the post-war Europe. Photo: Winston Churchill, Franklin Roosevelt and Joseph Stalin in Yalta
On 4–11 February 1945 US, UK and Soviet leaders held a conference in the USSR's Yalta, where they made arrengements about the post-war Europe. Photo: Winston Churchill, Franklin Roosevelt and Joseph Stalin in Yalta
On 4–11 February 1945 US, UK and Soviet leaders held a conference in the USSR's Yalta, where they made arrengements about the post-war Europe. Photo: Winston Churchill, Franklin Roosevelt and Joseph Stalin in Yalta
© ITAR-TASS/Archive/Sarariy Gurariy
They agreed to split Germany into four occupation zones: French, British, American and Soviet. Photo: a view of Berlin at the end of the war (May 1945)
They agreed to split Germany into four occupation zones: French, British, American and Soviet. Photo: a view of Berlin at the end of the war (May 1945)
They agreed to split Germany into four occupation zones: French, British, American and Soviet. Photo: a view of Berlin at the end of the war (May 1945)
© ITAR-TASS/Ivan Shagin
Berlin was also devided into four sectors, eventually merging into West Berlin, controlled by the Western Allies, and East Berlin, held by the Soviets. Photo: center of Berlin after the war
Berlin was also devided into four sectors, eventually merging into West Berlin, controlled by the Western Allies, and East Berlin, held by the Soviets. Photo: center of Berlin after the war
Berlin was also devided into four sectors, eventually merging into West Berlin, controlled by the Western Allies, and East Berlin, held by the Soviets. Photo: center of Berlin after the war
© Fotokhronika TASS/Reproduction
As the Cold War started, the occupation zones began to merge, leaving the Soviet and the Western Allied zone, surrounded by East German territory. Photo: West Berlin children watch US airplanes during the Berlin Airlift, that stopped the Soviet blockade
As the Cold War started, the occupation zones began to merge, leaving the Soviet and the Western Allied zone, surrounded by East German territory. Photo: West Berlin children watch US airplanes during the Berlin Airlift, that stopped the Soviet blockade
As the Cold War started, the occupation zones began to merge, leaving the Soviet and the Western Allied zone, surrounded by East German territory. Photo: West Berlin children watch US airplanes during the Berlin Airlift, that stopped the Soviet blockade
© AP Photo/File
In the 1950's the USSR started controlling national movement. In 1956, all travel to the West was restricted and in 1961 the construction of a wall between two parts of Berlin started
In the 1950's the USSR started controlling national movement. In 1956, all travel to the West was restricted and in 1961 the construction of a wall between two parts of Berlin started
In the 1950's the USSR started controlling national movement. In 1956, all travel to the West was restricted and in 1961 the construction of a wall between two parts of Berlin started
© AP Photo, File
The capital of the new state —  Federal Republic of Germany — was de facto the city of Bonn. Photo: US president John Kennedy alongside German Chancellor Adenauer in Bonn
The capital of the new state —  Federal Republic of Germany — was de facto the city of Bonn. Photo: US president John Kennedy alongside German Chancellor Adenauer in Bonn
The capital of the new state — Federal Republic of Germany — was de facto the city of Bonn. Photo: US president John Kennedy alongside German Chancellor Adenauer in Bonn
© AP Photo
The majority of East Germans could not travel to West Germany, families were split, some people were cut off from their jobs
The majority of East Germans could not travel to West Germany, families were split, some people were cut off from their jobs
The majority of East Germans could not travel to West Germany, families were split, some people were cut off from their jobs
© AP Photo/Werner Kreusch, File
In the late 1980's East Germans started mass emigration through Hungary. The wall lost its significance and was demolished. The date on which the Wall fell is considered to have been 9 November 1989
In the late 1980's East Germans started mass emigration through Hungary. The wall lost its significance and was demolished. The date on which the Wall fell is considered to have been 9 November 1989
In the late 1980's East Germans started mass emigration through Hungary. The wall lost its significance and was demolished. The date on which the Wall fell is considered to have been 9 November 1989
© ITAR-TASS/Archive
Berliners sing and dance on top of The Berlin Wall to celebrate the opening of East-West German borders
Berliners sing and dance on top of The Berlin Wall to celebrate the opening of East-West German borders
Berliners sing and dance on top of The Berlin Wall to celebrate the opening of East-West German borders
© AP Photo/Thomas Kienzle
East German citizens crowd a mobile bank office in West Berlin to pick up "welcome money" donated by the West Germany government for East Germans visiting the West
East German citizens crowd a mobile bank office in West Berlin to pick up "welcome money" donated by the West Germany government for East Germans visiting the West
East German citizens crowd a mobile bank office in West Berlin to pick up "welcome money" donated by the West Germany government for East Germans visiting the West
© AP Photo/Lionel Cironneau
German reunification took place in 1990. The end of the unification process is officially referred to as German unity, celebrated on October 3. Photo: East German Parliament members vote for reunification
German reunification took place in 1990. The end of the unification process is officially referred to as German unity, celebrated on October 3. Photo: East German Parliament members vote for reunification
German reunification took place in 1990. The end of the unification process is officially referred to as German unity, celebrated on October 3. Photo: East German Parliament members vote for reunification
© AP-Photo/ebh/str/Arne Dedert
On 20 June 1991, it was decided, that both government and parliament should move to Berlin from Bonn
On 20 June 1991, it was decided, that both government and parliament should move to Berlin from Bonn
On 20 June 1991, it was decided, that both government and parliament should move to Berlin from Bonn
© AP Photo/Markus Schreiber
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On 4–11 February 1945 US, UK and Soviet leaders held a conference in the USSR's Yalta, where they made arrengements about the post-war Europe. Photo: Winston Churchill, Franklin Roosevelt and Joseph Stalin in Yalta
© ITAR-TASS/Archive/Sarariy Gurariy
They agreed to split Germany into four occupation zones: French, British, American and Soviet. Photo: a view of Berlin at the end of the war (May 1945)
© ITAR-TASS/Ivan Shagin
Berlin was also devided into four sectors, eventually merging into West Berlin, controlled by the Western Allies, and East Berlin, held by the Soviets. Photo: center of Berlin after the war
© Fotokhronika TASS/Reproduction
As the Cold War started, the occupation zones began to merge, leaving the Soviet and the Western Allied zone, surrounded by East German territory. Photo: West Berlin children watch US airplanes during the Berlin Airlift, that stopped the Soviet blockade
© AP Photo/File
In the 1950's the USSR started controlling national movement. In 1956, all travel to the West was restricted and in 1961 the construction of a wall between two parts of Berlin started
© AP Photo, File
The capital of the new state — Federal Republic of Germany — was de facto the city of Bonn. Photo: US president John Kennedy alongside German Chancellor Adenauer in Bonn
© AP Photo
The majority of East Germans could not travel to West Germany, families were split, some people were cut off from their jobs
© AP Photo/Werner Kreusch, File
In the late 1980's East Germans started mass emigration through Hungary. The wall lost its significance and was demolished. The date on which the Wall fell is considered to have been 9 November 1989
© ITAR-TASS/Archive
Berliners sing and dance on top of The Berlin Wall to celebrate the opening of East-West German borders
© AP Photo/Thomas Kienzle
East German citizens crowd a mobile bank office in West Berlin to pick up "welcome money" donated by the West Germany government for East Germans visiting the West
© AP Photo/Lionel Cironneau
German reunification took place in 1990. The end of the unification process is officially referred to as German unity, celebrated on October 3. Photo: East German Parliament members vote for reunification
© AP-Photo/ebh/str/Arne Dedert
On 20 June 1991, it was decided, that both government and parliament should move to Berlin from Bonn
© AP Photo/Markus Schreiber

The Federal Republic of Germany was foiunded on May 23, 1949. It included the West Allies' occupation zones. Read and see more about the history of the country in this photo gallery by ITAR-TASS.

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