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IOC refuses to name Russian athletes implicated in McLaren’s report

December 23, 2016, 17:35 UTC+3 MOSCOW
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© EPA/CHRISTIAN BRUN

MOSCOW, December 23. /TASS/. The International Olympic Committee (IOC) told TASS on Friday that it would not be making public the names of Russian athletes, who had been subjected to the disciplinary procedures earlier in the day by the world’s governing Olympic body.

Asked by a TASS correspondent whether it was possible to name the Russian athletes at the issue, the IOC stated that no details would be provided until its investigation was completed.

The international Olympic body stated earlier in the day that re-analysis of doping samples, collected from 28 Russian athletes of 2014 Winter Games, had been allegedly tampered with.

"Prof. McLaren had investigated 95 samples of Russian athletes provided to him by the IOC," the official statement from the IOC said earlier in the day. "They led to the 28 athletes with evidence of sample manipulation."

"They have now been repatriated back to the Lausanne Anti-Doping Laboratory, and re-analysis has already begun on these samples looking for any Adverse Analytical Findings," the IOC stated.

According to the Part 2 report, delivered less than two weeks ago in London by the WADA Independent Commission and its chairman, Canadian sports law professor Richard McLaren, over 1,000 Russian athletes competing in summer, winter and Paralympic sports could have been involved in the manipulations system to conceal positive doping tests.

McLaren’s Part Two report claimed in particular that doping samples of 12 Russian medalists of 2014 Winter Games in Sochi had been tampered with. In addition, doping tests of two more Russian athletes, who won four gold medals of the 2014 Sochi Olympics had been falsified as well.

The report did not mention particular names and McLaren later said that the decision against making public the names of athletes, who are allegedly guilty of doping abuse, was made in respect to their private life, and, moreover, it should be done by international sports federations and not him personally.

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