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Not only groundhog: weather-predicting animals

February 02, 17:30 UTC+3

This year, Phil the US weather prognosticating groundhog predicted six more weeks of winter

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Groundhog Club co-handler raises Phil the weather prognosticating groundhog from his burrow during the Groundhog Day celebration at in Punxsutawney, USA. Phil saw his shadow and predicted six more weeks of winter
Groundhog Club co-handler raises Phil the weather prognosticating groundhog from his burrow during the Groundhog Day celebration at in Punxsutawney, USA. Phil saw his shadow and predicted six more weeks of winter
Groundhog Club co-handler raises Phil the weather prognosticating groundhog from his burrow during the Groundhog Day celebration at in Punxsutawney, USA. Phil saw his shadow and predicted six more weeks of winter
© EPA/DAVID MAXWELL
When butterflies disappear from the flower beds, some heavy weather can be expected
When butterflies disappear from the flower beds, some heavy weather can be expected
When butterflies disappear from the flower beds, some heavy weather can be expected
© Vladimir Smirnov/TASS
Farmers claim that caws can forecast the weather. According to legend, when cows sense bad weather, they become restless and antsy and begin to swat flies with their tails or lie down in the pasture to save a dry spot
Farmers claim that caws can forecast the weather. According to legend, when cows sense bad weather, they become restless and antsy and begin to swat flies with their tails or lie down in the pasture to save a dry spot
Farmers claim that caws can forecast the weather. According to legend, when cows sense bad weather, they become restless and antsy and begin to swat flies with their tails or lie down in the pasture to save a dry spot
© Ruslan Shamukov/TASS
Frogs are said to croak even longer and louder than usual when bad weather is on the horizon
Frogs are said to croak even longer and louder than usual when bad weather is on the horizon
Frogs are said to croak even longer and louder than usual when bad weather is on the horizon
© AP Photo/Sang Tan
“When sheep gather in a huddle, tomorrow will have a puddle.” It's believed that you can expect a storm when these animals crowd together
“When sheep gather in a huddle, tomorrow will have a puddle.” It's believed that you can expect a storm when these animals crowd together
“When sheep gather in a huddle, tomorrow will have a puddle.” It's believed that you can expect a storm when these animals crowd together
© Denis Abramov/TASS
It is said that if you notice ladybugs looking for shelter, then cold weather is on the way. On the other hand, “when they swarm, expect a day that’s warm”
It is said that if you notice ladybugs looking for shelter, then cold weather is on the way. On the other hand, “when they swarm, expect a day that’s warm”
It is said that if you notice ladybugs looking for shelter, then cold weather is on the way. On the other hand, “when they swarm, expect a day that’s warm”
© Sven Hoppe/dpa via AP
Misgurnus, commonly known as weatherfishes or weather loaches, become very active during barometric pressure changes that occur during thunderstorms
Misgurnus, commonly known as weatherfishes or weather loaches, become very active during barometric pressure changes that occur during thunderstorms
Misgurnus, commonly known as weatherfishes or weather loaches, become very active during barometric pressure changes that occur during thunderstorms
© opencage.info
Seagulls tend to stop flying and take refuge at the coast if a storm is coming
Seagulls tend to stop flying and take refuge at the coast if a storm is coming
Seagulls tend to stop flying and take refuge at the coast if a storm is coming
© Artiom Geodakyan/TASS
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Groundhog Club co-handler raises Phil the weather prognosticating groundhog from his burrow during the Groundhog Day celebration at in Punxsutawney, USA. Phil saw his shadow and predicted six more weeks of winter
© EPA/DAVID MAXWELL
When butterflies disappear from the flower beds, some heavy weather can be expected
© Vladimir Smirnov/TASS
Farmers claim that caws can forecast the weather. According to legend, when cows sense bad weather, they become restless and antsy and begin to swat flies with their tails or lie down in the pasture to save a dry spot
© Ruslan Shamukov/TASS
Frogs are said to croak even longer and louder than usual when bad weather is on the horizon
© AP Photo/Sang Tan
“When sheep gather in a huddle, tomorrow will have a puddle.” It's believed that you can expect a storm when these animals crowd together
© Denis Abramov/TASS
It is said that if you notice ladybugs looking for shelter, then cold weather is on the way. On the other hand, “when they swarm, expect a day that’s warm”
© Sven Hoppe/dpa via AP
Misgurnus, commonly known as weatherfishes or weather loaches, become very active during barometric pressure changes that occur during thunderstorms
© opencage.info
Seagulls tend to stop flying and take refuge at the coast if a storm is coming
© Artiom Geodakyan/TASS

Groundhog Day has been celebrated in US since 1887. Legend has it that if the animal doesn't see his shadow on February 2, spring will come early. This year Phil the US weather prognosticating groundhog saw his shadow and predicted six more weeks of winter. The other weather-predicting animals - in this photo gallery.

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