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Take a ride down memory lane through Moscow's amazing subway system

May 15, 16:10 UTC+3

On May 15, 1935 the first line of the Moscow Metro, connecting Sokolniki to Park Kultury, was opened to the public

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On May 15, 1935 the first line of the Moscow Metro, connecting Sokolniki to Park Kultury, was opened to the public. Photo: People entering the first train before trial ride from Komsomolskaya to Sokolniki metro stations
On May 15, 1935 the first line of the Moscow Metro, connecting Sokolniki to Park Kultury, was opened to the public. Photo: People entering the first train before trial ride from Komsomolskaya to Sokolniki metro stations
On May 15, 1935 the first line of the Moscow Metro, connecting Sokolniki to Park Kultury, was opened to the public. Photo: People entering the first train before trial ride from Komsomolskaya to Sokolniki metro stations
© Fotokhronika TASS
It was 11 kilometres long and included 13 stations. Photo: Passengers take a train going on the first line of the Moscow Metro, 1935
It was 11 kilometres long and included 13 stations. Photo: Passengers take a train going on the first line of the Moscow Metro, 1935
It was 11 kilometres long and included 13 stations. Photo: Passengers take a train going on the first line of the Moscow Metro, 1935
© Ivan Shagin/TASS
Soviet workers did the labor and the art work, but the main engineering designs, routes, and construction plans were developed with the help of London Underground construction engineers
Soviet workers did the labor and the art work, but the main engineering designs, routes, and construction plans were developed with the help of London Underground construction engineers
Soviet workers did the labor and the art work, but the main engineering designs, routes, and construction plans were developed with the help of London Underground construction engineers
© Viktor Budan, Viktor Uglik/TASS
The Moscow Metro was one of the USSR’s most extravagant architectural projects
The Moscow Metro was one of the USSR’s most extravagant architectural projects
The Moscow Metro was one of the USSR’s most extravagant architectural projects
© Fotokhronika TASS
The system is mostly underground, with the deepest section 84 metres underground at the Park Pobedy station, one of the world's deepest. Photo: A view of the 4th construction stage of the Moscow Metro, 1948
The system is mostly underground, with the deepest section 84 metres underground at the Park Pobedy station, one of the world's deepest. Photo: A view of the 4th construction stage of the Moscow Metro, 1948
The system is mostly underground, with the deepest section 84 metres underground at the Park Pobedy station, one of the world's deepest. Photo: A view of the 4th construction stage of the Moscow Metro, 1948
© Leonid Velikzhanin/TASS
Old metro stations are very imperial style with their reflective marble walls, high ceilings and grandiose chandeliers. Photo: Komsomolskaya station (Koltsevaya line) built in 1952
Old metro stations are very imperial style with their reflective marble walls, high ceilings and grandiose chandeliers. Photo: Komsomolskaya station (Koltsevaya line) built in 1952
Old metro stations are very imperial style with their reflective marble walls, high ceilings and grandiose chandeliers. Photo: Komsomolskaya station (Koltsevaya line) built in 1952
© Oleg Ivanov/TASS
Kiyevskaya Metro station, 1971
Kiyevskaya Metro station, 1971
Kiyevskaya Metro station, 1971
© Viktor Budan, Vasily Yegorov/TASS
Novoslobodskaya station built in 1952, pylons decorated with glass panels
Novoslobodskaya station built in 1952, pylons decorated with glass panels
Novoslobodskaya station built in 1952, pylons decorated with glass panels
© Viktor Budan, Vasily Yegorov/TASS
Each line is identified by a name, a number and a colour. The upcoming station is announced by a male voice on inbound trains to the city center, and by a female voice on outbound trains. Photo: Testing of a new rolling stock of Moscow Metro, 1992
Each line is identified by a name, a number and a colour. The upcoming station is announced by a male voice on inbound trains to the city center, and by a female voice on outbound trains. Photo: Testing of a new rolling stock of Moscow Metro, 1992
Each line is identified by a name, a number and a colour. The upcoming station is announced by a male voice on inbound trains to the city center, and by a female voice on outbound trains. Photo: Testing of a new rolling stock of Moscow Metro, 1992
© Stanislav Panov/TASS
As of 2017, the Moscow Metro excluding the Moscow Central Circle has 206 stations and its route length is 339.1 km. Photo: A driver in the cab of a train at Varshavskoye Depot on Serpukhovsko-Timiryazevskaya Line of the Moscow Metro
As of 2017, the Moscow Metro excluding the Moscow Central Circle has 206 stations and its route length is 339.1 km. Photo: A driver in the cab of a train at Varshavskoye Depot on Serpukhovsko-Timiryazevskaya Line of the Moscow Metro
As of 2017, the Moscow Metro excluding the Moscow Central Circle has 206 stations and its route length is 339.1 km. Photo: A driver in the cab of a train at Varshavskoye Depot on Serpukhovsko-Timiryazevskaya Line of the Moscow Metro
© Artyom Geodakyan/TASS
The Moscow Metro is undergoing a major expansion, that will see its metro stations increase by almost 40 percent between now and 2020. Passengers in a car of the Aquarelle Train, displaying reproductions of paintings from the State Tretyakov Gallery collections, 2012
The Moscow Metro is undergoing a major expansion, that will see its metro stations increase by almost 40 percent between now and 2020. Passengers in a car of the Aquarelle Train, displaying reproductions of paintings from the State Tretyakov Gallery collections, 2012
The Moscow Metro is undergoing a major expansion, that will see its metro stations increase by almost 40 percent between now and 2020. Passengers in a car of the Aquarelle Train, displaying reproductions of paintings from the State Tretyakov Gallery collections, 2012
© Stanislav Krasilnikov/TASS
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On May 15, 1935 the first line of the Moscow Metro, connecting Sokolniki to Park Kultury, was opened to the public. Photo: People entering the first train before trial ride from Komsomolskaya to Sokolniki metro stations
© Fotokhronika TASS
It was 11 kilometres long and included 13 stations. Photo: Passengers take a train going on the first line of the Moscow Metro, 1935
© Ivan Shagin/TASS
Soviet workers did the labor and the art work, but the main engineering designs, routes, and construction plans were developed with the help of London Underground construction engineers
© Viktor Budan, Viktor Uglik/TASS
The Moscow Metro was one of the USSR’s most extravagant architectural projects
© Fotokhronika TASS
The system is mostly underground, with the deepest section 84 metres underground at the Park Pobedy station, one of the world's deepest. Photo: A view of the 4th construction stage of the Moscow Metro, 1948
© Leonid Velikzhanin/TASS
Old metro stations are very imperial style with their reflective marble walls, high ceilings and grandiose chandeliers. Photo: Komsomolskaya station (Koltsevaya line) built in 1952
© Oleg Ivanov/TASS
Kiyevskaya Metro station, 1971
© Viktor Budan, Vasily Yegorov/TASS
Novoslobodskaya station built in 1952, pylons decorated with glass panels
© Viktor Budan, Vasily Yegorov/TASS
Each line is identified by a name, a number and a colour. The upcoming station is announced by a male voice on inbound trains to the city center, and by a female voice on outbound trains. Photo: Testing of a new rolling stock of Moscow Metro, 1992
© Stanislav Panov/TASS
As of 2017, the Moscow Metro excluding the Moscow Central Circle has 206 stations and its route length is 339.1 km. Photo: A driver in the cab of a train at Varshavskoye Depot on Serpukhovsko-Timiryazevskaya Line of the Moscow Metro
© Artyom Geodakyan/TASS
The Moscow Metro is undergoing a major expansion, that will see its metro stations increase by almost 40 percent between now and 2020. Passengers in a car of the Aquarelle Train, displaying reproductions of paintings from the State Tretyakov Gallery collections, 2012
© Stanislav Krasilnikov/TASS

On May 15, 1935 the first line of the Moscow Metro, connecting Sokolniki to Park Kultury, was opened to the public. It was 11 kilometres long and included 13 stations. As of 2017, the Moscow Metro excluding the Moscow Central Circle has 206 stations and its route length is 339.1 km. Today, the Moscow Metro is one of the main tourist attractions of the Russian capital. Major transformations of the Moscow Metro throughout the years in this photo gallery by TASS.

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