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Mir space station: a symbol of Soviet space glory

February 20, 19:30 UTC+3

On February 20, 1986, Soviet Union launched Mir space station

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On February 20, 1986, the Soviet Union launched Mir space station
On February 20, 1986, the Soviet Union launched Mir space station
On February 20, 1986, the Soviet Union launched Mir space station
© NASA
Assembled of seven major components, Mir was the first truly modular space station. Photo: Specialists of the Mission Control Centre watching the docking of the Kvant module and the Mir space station
Assembled of seven major components, Mir was the first truly modular space station. Photo: Specialists of the Mission Control Centre watching the docking of the Kvant module and the Mir space station
Assembled of seven major components, Mir was the first truly modular space station. Photo: Specialists of the Mission Control Centre watching the docking of the Kvant module and the Mir space station
© Albert Pushkarev/TASS
Mir space station  operated for more than 15 years in low Earth orbit
Mir space station  operated for more than 15 years in low Earth orbit
Mir space station operated for more than 15 years in low Earth orbit
© NASA
Mir was the first continuously inhabited long-term research station in orbit and held the record for the longest continuous human presence in space at 3,644 days, until it was surpassed by the ISS on 23 October 2010. Photo: Cosmonauts Yuri Romanenko and Alexander Viktorenko playing the guitar onboard the Mir space station, 1987
Mir was the first continuously inhabited long-term research station in orbit and held the record for the longest continuous human presence in space at 3,644 days, until it was surpassed by the ISS on 23 October 2010. Photo: Cosmonauts Yuri Romanenko and Alexander Viktorenko playing the guitar onboard the Mir space station, 1987
Mir was the first continuously inhabited long-term research station in orbit and held the record for the longest continuous human presence in space at 3,644 days, until it was surpassed by the ISS on 23 October 2010. Photo: Cosmonauts Yuri Romanenko and Alexander Viktorenko playing the guitar onboard the Mir space station, 1987
© TASS
On June 29, 1995, STS-71 became the first Shuttle mission ever to dock with the station. Photo: Cosmonaut Valeriy Polyako looks out Mir's window during rendezvous operations with the Space Shuttle Discovery, 1995
On June 29, 1995, STS-71 became the first Shuttle mission ever to dock with the station. Photo: Cosmonaut Valeriy Polyako looks out Mir's window during rendezvous operations with the Space Shuttle Discovery, 1995
On June 29, 1995, STS-71 became the first Shuttle mission ever to dock with the station. Photo: Cosmonaut Valeriy Polyako looks out Mir's window during rendezvous operations with the Space Shuttle Discovery, 1995
© NASA
The view of the Space Shuttle Atlantis during docking operations on March 23, 1996
The view of the Space Shuttle Atlantis during docking operations on March 23, 1996
The view of the Space Shuttle Atlantis during docking operations on March 23, 1996
© NASA
The space shuttle Atlantis connected to Russia's Mir Space Station, 1995
The space shuttle Atlantis connected to Russia's Mir Space Station, 1995
The space shuttle Atlantis connected to Russia's Mir Space Station, 1995
© NASA
Mir Space Station’s Spektr Module shows the backside of a solar array panel and damage incurred by the impact of a Russian unmanned Progress re-supply ship which collided with the space station on June 25, 1997
Mir Space Station’s Spektr Module shows the backside of a solar array panel and damage incurred by the impact of a Russian unmanned Progress re-supply ship which collided with the space station on June 25, 1997
Mir Space Station’s Spektr Module shows the backside of a solar array panel and damage incurred by the impact of a Russian unmanned Progress re-supply ship which collided with the space station on June 25, 1997
© NASA
The station served as a microgravity research laboratory in which crews conducted experiments in biology, human biology, physics, astronomy, meteorology and spacecraft systems. Photo: Progress-32  cargo ship in flight to the Mir space station
The station served as a microgravity research laboratory in which crews conducted experiments in biology, human biology, physics, astronomy, meteorology and spacecraft systems. Photo: Progress-32  cargo ship in flight to the Mir space station
The station served as a microgravity research laboratory in which crews conducted experiments in biology, human biology, physics, astronomy, meteorology and spacecraft systems. Photo: Progress-32 cargo ship in flight to the Mir space station
© TASS
Mir Space Station seen from the window of the Space Shuttle Atlantis
Mir Space Station seen from the window of the Space Shuttle Atlantis
Mir Space Station seen from the window of the Space Shuttle Atlantis
© NASA
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On February 20, 1986, the Soviet Union launched Mir space station
© NASA
Assembled of seven major components, Mir was the first truly modular space station. Photo: Specialists of the Mission Control Centre watching the docking of the Kvant module and the Mir space station
© Albert Pushkarev/TASS
Mir space station operated for more than 15 years in low Earth orbit
© NASA
Mir was the first continuously inhabited long-term research station in orbit and held the record for the longest continuous human presence in space at 3,644 days, until it was surpassed by the ISS on 23 October 2010. Photo: Cosmonauts Yuri Romanenko and Alexander Viktorenko playing the guitar onboard the Mir space station, 1987
© TASS
On June 29, 1995, STS-71 became the first Shuttle mission ever to dock with the station. Photo: Cosmonaut Valeriy Polyako looks out Mir's window during rendezvous operations with the Space Shuttle Discovery, 1995
© NASA
The view of the Space Shuttle Atlantis during docking operations on March 23, 1996
© NASA
The space shuttle Atlantis connected to Russia's Mir Space Station, 1995
© NASA
Mir Space Station’s Spektr Module shows the backside of a solar array panel and damage incurred by the impact of a Russian unmanned Progress re-supply ship which collided with the space station on June 25, 1997
© NASA
The station served as a microgravity research laboratory in which crews conducted experiments in biology, human biology, physics, astronomy, meteorology and spacecraft systems. Photo: Progress-32 cargo ship in flight to the Mir space station
© TASS
Mir Space Station seen from the window of the Space Shuttle Atlantis
© NASA

On February 20, 1986, Soviet Union launched the core module of Mir space station. Assembled of seven major components, Mir was the first truly modular space station. The station operated for more than 15 years in low Earth orbit. Mir was the first continuously inhabited long-term research station in orbit and held the record for the longest continuous human presence in space at 3,644 days, until it was surpassed by the ISS on 23 October 2010. TASS remembers the legendary Mir space station

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