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Russian lawmaker says EU should reconsider its policy toward Crimea

July 09, 2015, 14:46 UTC+3 MOSCOW
The lawmaker also suggested that European officials come to Crimea "to see the situation for themselves, and not through biased reports by political analysts and experts."
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© ITAR-TASS/Zurab Dzhavakhadze

MOSCOW, July 9. /TASS/. The European Union (EU) should revise its policy of blockading Crimea, and European officials should visit the peninsula and see the situation for themselves, Federation Council’s International Affairs Committee chairman Konstantin Kosachev, commenting on EU’s recent calls for holding another referendum in Crimea.

"The European Union should develop an appropriate approach to this problem, reconsider their policy of blockading Crimea and join discussions on the situation in Crimea," Kosachev said. The lawmaker also suggested that European officials come to Crimea "to see the situation for themselves, and not through biased reports by political analysts and experts." "EU’s current position on Crimea has led it to the deadlock which they still can’t solve. But this is EU’s problem, not Russia’s," he noted.

Talking about reports that recently appeared in the media on EU’s alleged calls for holding another referendum in Crimea, Kosachev said it was an unofficial initiative "denounced by the EU." "So there is nothing to discuss here," he stressed, noting that the fact that Crimea is part of Russia is undisputable.

Crimea’s reunification with Russia

Crimea, where most residents are ethnic Russians, refused to recognize the legitimacy of authorities brought to power amid riots during a coup in Ukraine in February 2014.

In mid-March last year, Crimea re-joined Russia following a referendum. More than 82% of the electorate took part in the vote. Over 96% backed splitting from Ukraine and spoke in favor of reuniting with Russia.

Results of the referendum were celebrated by many Crimeans but the vote was widely criticized by Western leaders and at the United Nations.

In the Soviet Union, Crimea was part of Russia until 1954, when Communist Party head Nikita Khrushchev transferred the Crimean region, along with Sevastopol, to Ukraine's jurisdiction as a gift.

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