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Putin’s pen used to sign Crimea treaty becomes museum piece

March 17, 2015, 11:28 UTC+3 MOSCOW

The piece will become part of a permanent exposition on Russia’s history in the 21th century and will lay foundation for creating a particular museum collection

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Crimea's head Sergey Aksenov, Crimean Supreme Council chairman Vladimir Konstantinov, Russian president Vladimir Putin, and Sevastopol head Alexey Chalyi signing a treaty on making the Republic of Crimea part of Russia

Crimea's head Sergey Aksenov, Crimean Supreme Council chairman Vladimir Konstantinov, Russian president Vladimir Putin, and Sevastopol head Alexey Chalyi signing a treaty on making the Republic of Crimea part of Russia

© ITAR-TASS/Mikhail Metzel

MOSCOW, March 17. /TASS/. The pen that Russian President Vladimir Putin used to sign a treaty on making the Republic of Crimea part of Russia will be shown for the first time at the exposition opening at the State Museum of Contemporary Russian History in downtown Moscow on Tuesday, the museum’s director has told TASS.

"There were four pens quantitatively to the signatories. We have exactly the pen which the president of the Russian Federation used to sign the treaty," Irina Velikanova said.

In future, the piece will become part of a permanent exposition on Russia’s history in the 21th century and will lay foundation for creating a particular museum collection, she said.

The exposition, prepared jointly by the Tavrida Central Museum in Simferopol and Russian Museum of Ethnography in St. Petersburg, has a total of 450 pieces and consists of three sections.

The sections are devoted to Crimea’s history as part of the Russian empire, the main events in the peninsula in the 20th century, and its search for national and political identity in the early 1990s. The exposition also includes the requests of Crimeans on being granted the Russian citizenship.

"There are also the materials here devoted to the events of spring 2014 - leaflets, posters and the uniform of Crimea’s Berkut [special police force] fighters which we received from our colleagues in Crimea," Velikanova said.

The exposition titled "Crimea: The History Of Return" will continue through April 12.

Russia and Crimea signed a treaty on the republic’s accession to Russia in March 2014. The document was inked by the Russian president, the leadership of Crimea and the mayor of Sevastopol.

Crimea used to be part of Russia from 1784 until 1954 when Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev handed it over to the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic in a voluntaristic act. Crimea remained part of independent Ukraine after the USSR collapsed in 1991.

A people’s referendum was held in Crimea on March 16, 2014, in which most people voted for reuniting with Russia. On March 18, 2014, Russian President Vladimir Putin signed a decree on Crimea’s integration into Russia.

In March 2014, Crimea’s Supreme Council adopted a declaration on the peninsula’s independence. A people’s referendum was held in Crimea on March 16, 2014, in which most people voted for reuniting with Russia.

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