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Russian and Soviet foreign ministers of the past 50 years

February 10, 2015, 16:18 UTC+3
Russia celebrates the diplomatic workers' day on February 10
1 pages in this article
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Andrei Gromyko served as Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Soviet Union in 1957–1985. Photo: Andrei Gromyko cutting the grass, 1971
Andrei Gromyko served as Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Soviet Union in 1957–1985. Photo: Andrei Gromyko cutting the grass, 1971
Andrei Gromyko served as Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Soviet Union in 1957–1985. Photo: Andrei Gromyko cutting the grass, 1971
© Fotokhronika TASS
Among his achievements were the signing of the Partial Test Ban Treaty in 1963, the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons in 1968, the ABM Treaty and SALT I, as well as the Agreement on the Prevention of Nuclear War in 1973. Photo: Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko and US Secretary of Agriculture Earl Butz, 1973
Among his achievements were the signing of the Partial Test Ban Treaty in 1963, the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons in 1968, the ABM Treaty and SALT I, as well as the Agreement on the Prevention of Nuclear War in 1973. Photo: Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko and US Secretary of Agriculture Earl Butz, 1973
Among his achievements were the signing of the Partial Test Ban Treaty in 1963, the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons in 1968, the ABM Treaty and SALT I, as well as the Agreement on the Prevention of Nuclear War in 1973. Photo: Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko and US Secretary of Agriculture Earl Butz, 1973
© ITAR-TASS/Vladimir Musaelyan, Valentin Sobolev
Eduard Shevardnadze was foreign minister under Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev in 1985 -1990. In November 1991 Shevardnadze returned briefly as Soviet Foreign Minister but resigned when the Soviet Union was formally dissolved
Eduard Shevardnadze was foreign minister under Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev in 1985 -1990. In November 1991 Shevardnadze returned briefly as Soviet Foreign Minister but resigned when the Soviet Union was formally dissolved
Eduard Shevardnadze was foreign minister under Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev in 1985 -1990. In November 1991 Shevardnadze returned briefly as Soviet Foreign Minister but resigned when the Soviet Union was formally dissolved
© Fotokhronika TASS/Eduard Pesov
Eduard Shevardnadze played a key role in the process that marked the end of the Cold War. Photo: French Prime Minister Jacques Chirac meeting with Soviet foreign minister Eduard Shevardnadze, 1986
Eduard Shevardnadze played a key role in the process that marked the end of the Cold War. Photo: French Prime Minister Jacques Chirac meeting with Soviet foreign minister Eduard Shevardnadze, 1986
Eduard Shevardnadze played a key role in the process that marked the end of the Cold War. Photo: French Prime Minister Jacques Chirac meeting with Soviet foreign minister Eduard Shevardnadze, 1986
© Fotokhronika TASS/Eduard Pesov
Alexander Bessmertnykh served as a Minister of Foreign Affairs of the USSR in 1991, replacing Eduard Shevardnadze. He took part in the signing of the Soviet-American START-1 Treaty in July 1991. Photo: Minister of Foreign Affairs of the USSR Alexander Bessmertnykh and Minister of Foreign Affairs of Mexico Fernando Solana Morales
Alexander Bessmertnykh served as a Minister of Foreign Affairs of the USSR in 1991, replacing Eduard Shevardnadze. He took part in the signing of the Soviet-American START-1 Treaty in July 1991. Photo: Minister of Foreign Affairs of the USSR Alexander Bessmertnykh and Minister of Foreign Affairs of Mexico Fernando Solana Morales
Alexander Bessmertnykh served as a Minister of Foreign Affairs of the USSR in 1991, replacing Eduard Shevardnadze. He took part in the signing of the Soviet-American START-1 Treaty in July 1991. Photo: Minister of Foreign Affairs of the USSR Alexander Bessmertnykh and Minister of Foreign Affairs of Mexico Fernando Solana Morales
© Fotokhronika TASS/Valentin Kuzmin
Boris Pankin served as Foreign Minister before the Soviet Union's collapse in 1991 only for few months. He managed to establish diplomatic relations with the State of Israel and to begin the Soviet-US disarmament process
Boris Pankin served as Foreign Minister before the Soviet Union's collapse in 1991 only for few months. He managed to establish diplomatic relations with the State of Israel and to begin the Soviet-US disarmament process
Boris Pankin served as Foreign Minister before the Soviet Union's collapse in 1991 only for few months. He managed to establish diplomatic relations with the State of Israel and to begin the Soviet-US disarmament process
© Fotokhronika TASS/Eduard Pesov
Andrei Kozyrev became the first foreign minister of Russia from October 1991 until January 1996. Photo: Russian foreign minister Andrei Kozyrev and German foreign minister Klaus Kinkel, 1993
Andrei Kozyrev became the first foreign minister of Russia from October 1991 until January 1996. Photo: Russian foreign minister Andrei Kozyrev and German foreign minister Klaus Kinkel, 1993
Andrei Kozyrev became the first foreign minister of Russia from October 1991 until January 1996. Photo: Russian foreign minister Andrei Kozyrev and German foreign minister Klaus Kinkel, 1993
© ITAR-TASS/Gennady Popov
As Russia's foreign minister Andrei Kozyrev emphasized cooperation over conflict with the United States. Kozyrev's position in relations with West earned him the title of Mr. Yes. Photo: Andrei Kozyrev (right), 1992
As Russia's foreign minister Andrei Kozyrev emphasized cooperation over conflict with the United States. Kozyrev's position in relations with West earned him the title of Mr. Yes. Photo: Andrei Kozyrev (right), 1992
As Russia's foreign minister Andrei Kozyrev emphasized cooperation over conflict with the United States. Kozyrev's position in relations with West earned him the title of Mr. Yes. Photo: Andrei Kozyrev (right), 1992
© Fotokhronika TASS/Alexander Sentsov, Nikolai Malyshev
In 1992, Andrei Kozyrev, together with Ministers of Foreign Affairs from the Baltic Sea area and an EU commissioner, founded the Council of the Baltic Sea States. Photo: Andrei Kozyrev in Russia's northwestern city of Murmansk, 1994
In 1992, Andrei Kozyrev, together with Ministers of Foreign Affairs from the Baltic Sea area and an EU commissioner, founded the Council of the Baltic Sea States. Photo: Andrei Kozyrev in Russia's northwestern city of Murmansk, 1994
In 1992, Andrei Kozyrev, together with Ministers of Foreign Affairs from the Baltic Sea area and an EU commissioner, founded the Council of the Baltic Sea States. Photo: Andrei Kozyrev in Russia's northwestern city of Murmansk, 1994
© ITAR-TASS/Semen Maisterman
Yevgeny Primakov served as foreign minister in 1996 - 1998. He was an opponent of NATO's expansion into the former Eastern bloc, though on 27 May 1997 Russia and NATO signed the Foundation Act, a road map for future NATO-Russia cooperation. Photo: NATO Secretary General Javier Solana and Russian Foreign Minister Yevgeny Primakov in Berlin, 1996
Yevgeny Primakov served as foreign minister in 1996 - 1998. He was an opponent of NATO's expansion into the former Eastern bloc, though on 27 May 1997 Russia and NATO signed the Foundation Act, a road map for future NATO-Russia cooperation. Photo: NATO Secretary General Javier Solana and Russian Foreign Minister Yevgeny Primakov in Berlin, 1996
Yevgeny Primakov served as foreign minister in 1996 - 1998. He was an opponent of NATO's expansion into the former Eastern bloc, though on 27 May 1997 Russia and NATO signed the Foundation Act, a road map for future NATO-Russia cooperation. Photo: NATO Secretary General Javier Solana and Russian Foreign Minister Yevgeny Primakov in Berlin, 1996
© AP Photo/Jan Bauer
Igor Ivanov was Foreign Minister of Russia from 1998 to 2004. While in office he opposed NATO's action in Yugoslavia and US invasion of Iraq.
Igor Ivanov was Foreign Minister of Russia from 1998 to 2004. While in office he opposed NATO's action in Yugoslavia and US invasion of Iraq.
Igor Ivanov was Foreign Minister of Russia from 1998 to 2004. While in office he opposed NATO's action in Yugoslavia and US invasion of Iraq.
© ITAR-TASS/Eduard Pesov
Sergei Lavrov was appointed as Russia's Foreign Minister in 2004. Photo: Sergei Lavrov at the 51st Security Conference in Munich, Germany
Sergei Lavrov was appointed as Russia's Foreign Minister in 2004. Photo: Sergei Lavrov at the 51st Security Conference in Munich, Germany
Sergei Lavrov was appointed as Russia's Foreign Minister in 2004. Photo: Sergei Lavrov at the 51st Security Conference in Munich, Germany
© EPA/TOBIAS HASE
Photo: Russian Foreign Minister, President of the Rowing Federation of Russia Sergei Lavrov during the opening of the Cup of Russia on a rowing slalom
Photo: Russian Foreign Minister, President of the Rowing Federation of Russia Sergei Lavrov during the opening of the Cup of Russia on a rowing slalom
Photo: Russian Foreign Minister, President of the Rowing Federation of Russia Sergei Lavrov during the opening of the Cup of Russia on a rowing slalom
© ITAR-TASS/Vladimir Mukagov
Photo: Former Russian Foreign Ministers Igor Ivanov and Yevgeny Primakov and acting Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov at a meeting of the Russian International Affairs Council
Photo: Former Russian Foreign Ministers Igor Ivanov and Yevgeny Primakov and acting Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov at a meeting of the Russian International Affairs Council
Photo: Former Russian Foreign Ministers Igor Ivanov and Yevgeny Primakov and acting Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov at a meeting of the Russian International Affairs Council
© ITAR-TASS/Zurab Dzhavakhadze
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Andrei Gromyko served as Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Soviet Union in 1957–1985. Photo: Andrei Gromyko cutting the grass, 1971
© Fotokhronika TASS
Among his achievements were the signing of the Partial Test Ban Treaty in 1963, the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons in 1968, the ABM Treaty and SALT I, as well as the Agreement on the Prevention of Nuclear War in 1973. Photo: Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko and US Secretary of Agriculture Earl Butz, 1973
© ITAR-TASS/Vladimir Musaelyan, Valentin Sobolev
Eduard Shevardnadze was foreign minister under Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev in 1985 -1990. In November 1991 Shevardnadze returned briefly as Soviet Foreign Minister but resigned when the Soviet Union was formally dissolved
© Fotokhronika TASS/Eduard Pesov
Eduard Shevardnadze played a key role in the process that marked the end of the Cold War. Photo: French Prime Minister Jacques Chirac meeting with Soviet foreign minister Eduard Shevardnadze, 1986
© Fotokhronika TASS/Eduard Pesov
Alexander Bessmertnykh served as a Minister of Foreign Affairs of the USSR in 1991, replacing Eduard Shevardnadze. He took part in the signing of the Soviet-American START-1 Treaty in July 1991. Photo: Minister of Foreign Affairs of the USSR Alexander Bessmertnykh and Minister of Foreign Affairs of Mexico Fernando Solana Morales
© Fotokhronika TASS/Valentin Kuzmin
Boris Pankin served as Foreign Minister before the Soviet Union's collapse in 1991 only for few months. He managed to establish diplomatic relations with the State of Israel and to begin the Soviet-US disarmament process
© Fotokhronika TASS/Eduard Pesov
Andrei Kozyrev became the first foreign minister of Russia from October 1991 until January 1996. Photo: Russian foreign minister Andrei Kozyrev and German foreign minister Klaus Kinkel, 1993
© ITAR-TASS/Gennady Popov
As Russia's foreign minister Andrei Kozyrev emphasized cooperation over conflict with the United States. Kozyrev's position in relations with West earned him the title of Mr. Yes. Photo: Andrei Kozyrev (right), 1992
© Fotokhronika TASS/Alexander Sentsov, Nikolai Malyshev
In 1992, Andrei Kozyrev, together with Ministers of Foreign Affairs from the Baltic Sea area and an EU commissioner, founded the Council of the Baltic Sea States. Photo: Andrei Kozyrev in Russia's northwestern city of Murmansk, 1994
© ITAR-TASS/Semen Maisterman
Yevgeny Primakov served as foreign minister in 1996 - 1998. He was an opponent of NATO's expansion into the former Eastern bloc, though on 27 May 1997 Russia and NATO signed the Foundation Act, a road map for future NATO-Russia cooperation. Photo: NATO Secretary General Javier Solana and Russian Foreign Minister Yevgeny Primakov in Berlin, 1996
© AP Photo/Jan Bauer
Igor Ivanov was Foreign Minister of Russia from 1998 to 2004. While in office he opposed NATO's action in Yugoslavia and US invasion of Iraq.
© ITAR-TASS/Eduard Pesov
Sergei Lavrov was appointed as Russia's Foreign Minister in 2004. Photo: Sergei Lavrov at the 51st Security Conference in Munich, Germany
© EPA/TOBIAS HASE
Photo: Russian Foreign Minister, President of the Rowing Federation of Russia Sergei Lavrov during the opening of the Cup of Russia on a rowing slalom
© ITAR-TASS/Vladimir Mukagov
Photo: Former Russian Foreign Ministers Igor Ivanov and Yevgeny Primakov and acting Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov at a meeting of the Russian International Affairs Council
© ITAR-TASS/Zurab Dzhavakhadze

Russia celebrates the diplomatic workers' day on February 10. It was established in 2002 to mark the 200th anniversary of the founding of the Russian Foreign Ministry. Russian and Soviet top diplomats of the past 50 years - in photo gallery by TASS.

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