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Rather rivalry than co-operation in new Ukraine parliament - Russian political expert

October 27, 2014, 6:15 UTC+3 MOSCOW
The situation is also complicated by the fact that Poroshenko and Yatsenyuk sought to win sympathies of some part of radically-driven electorate, the political expert said
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© AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky

MOSCOW, October 27. /TASS/. Upon results of early election in Ukraine’s parliament, the Verkhovna Rada, incumbent President Petro Poroshenko will not be able to form a stable pro-presidential majority in parliament quite easily, Doctor of Political Sciences and Professor of the Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration Alexander Mikhailenko told TASS.

“First exit polls take into account only the vote on party lists,” he noted, adding that “But already now we see that the Petro Poroshenko Bloc (led by the president) and (Prime Minister) Arseniy Yatsenyuk’s People’s Front gain approximately equal percentage of votes. Therefore, there is still a big question who of them will win after vote count in one-seat constituencies. So, I would sooner expect rivalry of parties than their co-operation in a new Ukrainian parliament.”

As for reasons behind this election situation, Alexander Mikhailenko noted that the Petro Poroshenko Bloc had put forward a quite undefined strategy of country’s development up to 2020. “This reminds me of a programme of the Soviet Union Communist Party,” he noted, adding that Arseny Yatsenyuk had a more clear-cut and concrete programme “underlying the need to fulfil pledges new authorities gave, otherwise, they will be just ousted from power.”

Meanwhile, the situation is also complicated by the fact that Poroshenko and Yatsenyuk sought to win sympathies of some part of radically-driven electorate, the political expert said.

“They succeeded to do this that was proved by quite low figures of extremely radical forces at elections,” Mikhailenko noted, adding that “However, winners have gained not only votes, but also the duty to give a reply to expectations of radical part of voters. They will not be able to forget about this. Radically minded people will press on them and they will have to take some decisions.

 

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