Currency converter
^
News Feed
News Search Topics
ОК
Use filter
You can filter your feed,
by choosing only interesting
sections.
Loading

Crimean authorities have no plans to ban the Mejilis of Crimean Tatar people

July 30, 2014, 17:46 UTC+3 SIMFEROPOL
Speaker of Crimean parliament Vladimir Konstantinov believes that Crimean Tatar politicians like Vice-Speaker Remzi Ilyasov could be held as an example of holding a constructive stance
1 pages in this article
Crimean Tatars' protest in May 2014

Crimean Tatars' protest in May 2014

© ITAR-TASS/Alexei Pavlishak

SIMFEROPOL, July 30. /ITAR-TASS/. The Speaker of Crimean parliament, Vladimir Konstantinov, told journalists on Wednesday the Crimean authorities had no plans to outlaw the Mejilis of the Crimean Tatar people.

“A ban is not in question. We are dealing with a stance of separate leaders that apart from being destructive has become politically unrealistic. I cannot understand people who make this kind of decisions. The only explanation is that they no longer live in Crimea and are unaware of what’s going on in the peninsula,” Konstantinov said.

He believes that Crimean Tatar politicians like Vice-Speaker Remzi Ilyasov could be held as an example of holding a constructive stance. Ilyasov has been visiting Tatar regions and villages and attending mass rallies across Crimea.

“He can see how Crimean Tatars feel and what they think. They have many problems, which someone has to solve. The Crimean authorities are ready to tackle and solve these problems,” the speaker went on to say.

Crimean Tatars, the indigenous population of the Crimean peninsula, faced ruthless deportation under the rule of Joseph Stalin in May 1944 who accused them of collaboration with the Nazis during World War II. In spring 2014, Russian President Vladimir Putin signed a decree on full rehabilitation of Crimean Tatars and other peoples deported from Crimea under Stalin.

Crimea has received 800 million rubles ($22.4 million) from the federal authorities to support the deported peoples of Crimea.

“It is the first time that we receive money for this purpose. Now, we have a real chance to get down to work,” the Crimean parliament speaker said.

Meanwhile, the Mejilis chief, Refat Chubarov, has been barred from entering Crimea for five years. Crimea’s Prosecutor Natalia Poklonskaya warned Chubarov early in July that the Crimean authorities might recognize the Mejilis to be an extremist organization.

Show more
In other media
Реклама
Реклама