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Russian arms manufacturer CEO considers gathered data sufficient to challenge EU sanctions

October 13, 2015, 13:46 UTC+3 MOSCOW
Almaz-Antey filed a lawsuit to an EU general court in Luxembourg on lifting the sanctions slapped against the Russian defense manufacturer in late May
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Almaz-Antei CEO Yan Novikov (center) looking at the screen during a news conference in Moscow

Almaz-Antei CEO Yan Novikov (center) looking at the screen during a news conference in Moscow

© AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin

MOSCOW, October 13. /TASS/. Russian antiaircraft missile system manufacturer Almaz-Antey has sufficient data after full-scale experiments as part of its own probe into the MH17 crash to challenge Western sanctions in a general court in the European Union, Almaz-Antey CEO Yan Novikov said on Tuesday.

"We have enough materials for a European court and we have fulfilled our task," he said.

Almaz-Antey presented on Tuesday the results of its experiments held as part of its own probe into the MH17 crash in east Ukraine last year.

The company's specialists have come to the conclusion that the airliner was shot down in the summer of 2014 by a missile of the older 9M38 modification whose manufacture stopped in 1986.

Almaz-Antey also confirmed the version that the fatal missile had been launched from the Zaroshchenskoye community reportedly controlled by the Ukrainian military and rejected the international commission’s version of the missile’s launch from Snezhnoye, a town that had been under militia’s control at that time.

Almaz-Antey filed a lawsuit to an EU general court in Luxembourg on lifting the sanctions slapped against the Russian defense manufacturer in late May. The company insists its inclusion in the sanctions list was unfounded.

The Malaysia Airlines Boeing-777 passenger airliner on a flight from the Dutch city of Amsterdam to the Malaysian capital of Kuala Lumpur crashed in the area of hostilities between local militias and Ukrainian governmental troops in east Ukraine’s Donetsk region in July last year. All 298 people aboard the airliner died in the air crash.

Most of the air crash’s victims were Dutch nationals.

Versions were put forward that the airliner could have been hit by a surface-to-air or an air-to-air missile.

The Ukrainian authorities and the militia of the self-proclaimed Donetsk People’s Republic accused each other of the airliner crash.

The UN Security Council resolved on July 21 to hold a comprehensive and independent probe.

Russia’s representatives have said on many occasions they are dissatisfied with how the investigation is being carried out and that the data presented by the Russian side are ignored.

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