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Putin, Israeli PM to talk fight against terrorism in Moscow

September 21, 2015, 13:36 UTC+3 MOSCOW
It is expected that the current meeting will focus on the issues of the Middle East settlement and the fight against international terrorism, including in the context of the situation in Syria
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Anti-terrorism drills (archive)

Anti-terrorism drills (archive)

© Vitaly Nevar/TASS

MOSCOW, September 21. /TASS/. Russian President Vladimir Putin and Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu are due to meet in Moscow on Monday to discuss the settlement in the Middle East and the fight against international terrorism, including in the context of the conflict in Syria, the Kremlin press service has said.

"During the Russian-Israeli talks at the highest level, an exchange of views on the most pressing issues of the regional and global agenda is traditionally held," the press service said. "It is expected that the current meeting will focus on the issues of the Middle East settlement and the fight against international terrorism, including in the context of the situation in Syria."

Israel is one of Russia’s key partners in the Middle East region. The leaders of the two countries have regular contacts. This year, Putin had three phone conversations with Netanyahu. Their last personal meeting was held on November 20, 2013. Besides, the Russian president met with Israel’s former President Shimon Peres in Moscow on June 23.

Last year, the trade turnover between Russia and Israel reached $3.4 billion. Russia’s exports to Israel amounted to $2.3 billon, mostly jewelry, metals and oil products. The imports from Israel, namely food and agricultural products, cars and equipment, reached $1.1 billon.

The Kremlin said the priorities of the bilateral cooperation are aircraft building, the agriculture and healthcare sector.

In 2014, some 386,000 Russians visited Israel, including the country’s Christian pilgrimage sites.

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