Currency converter
^
All news
News Search Topics
ОК
Use filter
You can filter your feed,
by choosing only interesting
sections.
Loading

Kremlin troubled by string of UK poisonings endangering all of Europe

July 09, 13:53 UTC+3

The Kremlin has no information about Russia allegedly being associated with the Amesbury incident, lambasts such ‘absurd’ accusations

Share
1 pages in this article
© AP Photo/Matt Dunham

MOSCOW, July 9. /TASS/. The Kremlin is alarmed at the repeat poisonings that recently hit Great Britain since they pose a grave danger to all of Europe, Russian Presidential Spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters.

"We regret the death of a British citizen [Dawn Sturgess died after being exposed to a nerve agent in the town of Amesbury on July 8 - TASS], we are still deeply concerned about the recurring poisonings on British soil. This imperils not only the British people but all Europeans as well," Peskov said.

The Kremlin spokesman pointed out that "given that these incidents are highly dangerous," Russia "from the very start has been offering its cooperation to Great Britain in investigating what happened in Salisbury." "Unfortunately, our suggestions never elicited a due response," he emphasized.

At the same time, in Peskov’s words, the Kremlin has no information about "Russia being somehow associated" with the Amesbury incident, and these allegations would be absurd.

"We don’t have any information about anyone mentioning Russia in connection with this second incident or Russia being somehow associated with it. We believe that in any case, it would be rather absurd," Peskov said.

The Kremlin spokesman was also confident that the Amesbury incident would not affect preparations for a meeting between the Russian and US presidents. "You know, it has nothing to do with the summit," Peskov stressed. "It is more of a British issue and the question is to what extent Great Britain is interested in conducting a real investigation," he noted.

Amesbury poisoning

On June 30, 44-year-old Dawn Sturgess and 45-year-old Charles Rowley were hospitalized in critical condition in the British town of Amesbury. The Metropolitan Police went on to claim later that the two had been exposed to Novichok, the same nerve agent that was allegedly used in the March poisoning of the Skripals in Salisbury. After being mysteriously exposed to a nerve agent and falling into a coma, Sturgess died on July 8.

Show more
Share
In other media
ADVERTISEMENT
Partner News
ADVERTISEMENT