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Russia may consider response measures in connection with Crimea blackout — minister

November 23, 2015, 21:46 UTC+3 TEHRAN
Crimea was left without energy on the night to November 22 after the supports of power lines leading to the peninsula were blown up
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Russian Energy Minister Alexander Novak

Russian Energy Minister Alexander Novak

© EPA/LAURENT DUBRULE

TEHRAN, November 23. /TASS/. Russia’s Energy Minister Alexander Novak does not rule out that Russia could consider response measures against Ukraine in connection with the electricity blackout of Crimea.

"Now I do not have the answer to this question, I think we will consider this question in the short term," Novak told journalists, answering the question, whether Russia considers possibility of introducing retaliatory measures against Ukraine, for example, by limiting the coal supply.

Crimea has enough petroleum products

The Russian Energy Ministry said Crimea’s reserves of petroleum products are sufficient for 10 to 26 days.

According to the ministry, the region’s reserve of the most popular gasoline brand AI-92 is enough for ten days, the reserve of AI-95 gasoline - for 13 days, diesel fuel - for 26 days. The reserve of fuel for mobile gas turbine plants exceeds 29 days, the ministry said in its press release.

The Russian Energy Ministry considers the Crimean fuel-supply situation as rather stable. The Kerch Straight ferry line is operating as usual.

Crimea left without energy 

Crimea was left without energy on the night to November 22 after the supports of power lines leading to the peninsula were blown up.

All major cities in Crimea are receiving energy. But the lack of locally generated power on the peninsula may cause rolling power and water cuts to households. All socially important facilities have been connected to reserve power supply sources.

Crimea’s needs in electric energy are met by 30%; all socially important facilities are operating normally, Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Kozak told journalists.

"The situation in Crimea is difficult but not critical," Kozak said. "Locally generated electric energy meets the peninsula’s needs by 30%; all socially important facilities, the airport and transport infrastructure are operating normally," the deputy prime minister said.

He added that the Russian authorities would step up the construction of a power transmission line via the Kerch Strait.

"The problem of energy supplies to Crimea will become less acute by mid-December. The government is considering a possibility to step up the construction of an energy bridge (from mainland Russia to the peninsula)," Kozak stressed.

According to him, all life-sustaining facilities in Crimea will work to full capacity in 2016 though rolling power cuts will be possible in houses and apartment buildings.

The energy bridge to Crimea project provides for the construction of a power transmission line from the Rostov nuclear power plant in southern Russia to Crimea’s capital Simferopol with one of its sections running through the bottom of the Kerch Strait. Its transmission capacity is to reach 300 MW at the start of 2016.

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